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"¿Tienes unos segundos?"

Translation:Do you have a few seconds?

5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Where I'm from, it's colloquial English to say, Can you spare a sec?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Yes. Also, we might say "do you have a moment" (un momento), "can you spare a minute" (podría disponer/conceder un minuto), "do you have a few minutes?" (tienes unos minutos ?)

However, in this case, the speaker said neither of those things. Thus, it's best to translate what they did say, not what they could, or might, have said.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elidio.Menezes

"do you have some seconds" shoud work here...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

I thought about your translation, paulus.germ.anus. The mostly literal "Have you got some seconds?" is not colloquial English.

I put "Do you have a few seconds?" because "segundos" is plural. One of DuoLinguo's guidelines is that a translation should be both as natural and as accurate as possible. In American English, it's also colloquial to say, "Do you have a second?"

Picking "few" instead of "some" stays true to the flavor of the request. When the word "few" is used, the listener is being asked to listen for a short time. In English, the words "few" and "some" are indefinite modifiers and are similar because each is describing an indefinite amount of time or an indefinite quantity. However, the word "few" is always used to indicate a small percentage. The word "some," on the other hand, indicates a percentage less than 100%. It is preferable to use "some" for up to 50%. People who exaggerate might use it for even higher percentages. This is not the minimum! (If I were talking about 60% to 99%, I would use the words "many" or "most.")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

LindaHill : Sorry, but I have some difficulties with your explanation. Where did you get the idea that "some" is less than 100%.? What does that mean? 100% of what? or 50% of what?

I put "some seconds" because that is the more literal, and DL often prefers the more literal. (I have been on DL for 2 1/2 years.)

"Seconds" can refer to clothing-- in clothing, "seconds" refers to clothing that is not perfect, and is sold more cheaply. Referring to clothing, "some seconds" makes more sense to me.

"Some seconds" should be accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klhes

it does

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/placeybordeaux

Does "Do you have a second" really not work here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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12/23/2013
This is now accepted, as it should be IMO
(I had no hearts left, I put in this answer (because I really thought it best), held my breath, and pushed enter)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/escribelibre

It's plural, so no

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoulderSpanish

I put "Do you have some deputies?" which has a completely different meaning? Does anyone know if this translation is used often? Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/collectedsoul

So when do you use algunos and when unos?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Often, there is no difference.

"Algunos" is also a pronoun. "Unos" is not."

Maybe these can help sort them out.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/any http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/some

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelantonio

I need help with this too

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johnny-jay

Does, "Tienes algunos segundos?" have the same meaning as "tienes unos segundos?". If not, what is the difference in their meaning?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desmondpenn

trust me. it should be translated to "do you have a minute?". At least we need to interpret this sentence this way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Why? I don't want you to spare me a minute, only a few seconds of your precious time!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hola302588

so "segundo" means "second" as in time and also "second" as in something like "second favorite" or "second place"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Exacto. Es igual en los dos idiomas

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klhes

What would a native english speaker say to politely get the attention of a person for a short time?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

"Do you have a minute?" "Do you have a sec?" (meaning "second") Using the plural "seconds/minutes/moments" is very odd in English (to me, in this context). I wrote "Do you have a moment?" and it was accepted. The Spanish is not literally "a moment," but it is how we (in English) express that period of time "unos segundos".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jitmans

Excuse me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arsenalfc
Arsenalfc
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I thought the word for few is pocos/pocas

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I think pocos/pocas emphasizes scarcity, as opposed to quantity, sort of the difference between "few" and "a few" in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Philip596952

Hola mis amigos!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jitmans

why does my audio not sound sometimes?

3 months ago