"Ihr geht es gut."

Translation:She is well.

May 7, 2014

89 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanEdinger

I don't recall learning this expression yet! Makes more sense than "She gets it good" though. shifty eyes

May 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

You sure you haven't learned: "Es geht mir gut"? I think it should be there somewhere :)

May 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianColl

I recall "mir geht's gut" but not "es geht mir gut". I think you just taught me that "geht's" is short for "geht es".

April 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twisted_reality

This is dative, not accusative...

June 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mateus1917

Isn't that so? I want to practice accusative, not dative >:(

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/015MFTXc

What does "dative" mean?

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markoduic

"Ihr geht es gut" should also permit "She's well" as well as "she's fine" or "she's doing well" as answers, no?

May 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hourikafai

Why can't we take "Ihr" as you formal thus :you are fine.

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because Ihr is not the dative case of Sie.

The dative case of Sie is Ihnen.

ihr is the dative case of sie meaning "she".

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MBellRacing

This site keeps throwing words that I have not learned yet into the mix. Not fun...

November 25, 2014

[deactivated user]

    Admittedly I just woke up but isn't "You are feeling well" also correct? As in plural 'you'..., literally "it goes well for you"? And if not how would that be written?

    May 25, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edesalto

    And I'm giving you a lingot because you have 246 day streaks and a lot of languages :) so much effort!!!

    October 9, 2014

    [deactivated user]

      Aw, thank you!

      October 9, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mebanite

      Same question, please.

      June 29, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

      You (plural) would be:

      • Euch geht es gut

      You need the dative here, not nominative. "Ihr" is plural you only in nominative.

      June 29, 2014

      [deactivated user]

        Ahh, thanks, EeroK. Got it now, I think:

        euch in Accusative = (you guys)

        euch in Dative = (to/for you guys)

        So "Euch geht es gut" = Lit "It is going well for you guys" ie "You are feeling well"

        Is that accurate?

        June 29, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

        You are exactly right!

        June 29, 2014

        [deactivated user]

          I'm giving you a lingot because this question is over a week old, and without your response I might not have looked back to see where I went wrong. Thanks!

          June 29, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirkbrownridge

          I would have thought it was: "Her going is good"

          May 7, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickMcM7

          "Geht" is not a noun.

          July 3, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cookieloo

          Why is it she's fine and not you're fine? In the tips and notes, it doesn't say Ihr can be she.

          June 5, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwinPeaksOwl

          The problem here is that this is Dative, not Akkusative. Duolingo is just throwing some new grammar at us ahead of time. In Dative, "ihr" can only mean she.

          May 3, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          If it would be you, it had to either: dir, Ihnen (formal) or euch (plural).

          It cannot mean anything else in this sentence.

          June 6, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lakissova

          Shouldn't "She is doing good" be a correct option as well?

          July 6, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asher-H

          If "Ihr geht es gut" translates literally as "She goes it well", and means she's doing well or feeling well, is there a reason why "She's going well" is not allowed? That's standard Australian English for she's doing well, and seems to translate exactly. Can anyone explain this?

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          Not exactly. "Ihr" is dative and means "(to) her", not "she". So very literally it means: "to her goes it well".

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asher-H

          Sorry, EeroK, if that looked argumentative. I meant dispute in the sense of debate. I understand the dative. It's "geht" that's giving me trouble. "To her it goes well" makes more sense than "to her it feels well" or "to her it does well", but none of these answers are accepted, anyway.
          "It" is a pronoun making reference to life, or the world, or her health, I think? And would "Ihr geht es gut" not be the same as saying "It's going well with her"? That's perfect English, and in the dative case. Sorry again. No room to discuss this properly.

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          I think the key here is that "es geht mir gut" is THE way to say that you are fine, feeling okay, doing good etc. in German. IMO there is really not much of a reason to go and start finding fitting (almost) word to word translations, that are fine, but maybe not just idiomatic English, because the language already has a lot of ways to express the same thing. The important thing is not what the individual words translate to, but what you express with the sentence.

          What someone learning German should learn, is that the phrase "es geht mir gut" is just what it is. There is no exact English translation, but it is the equivalent of almost all the positive English replies to "How are you doing/feeling?"

          ps. No problem. I like arguing about abstract things like this ;)

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asher-H

          I find it really helpful to know why an answer is wrong. Unless I'm still missing something, in this case I see it wasn't wrong, and this conversation has given me the motivation to make sure I understood the dative case. Thanks!

          July 29, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asher-H

          Thanks for your reply! What I meant was, why must I write "feeling" instead of "going"? "Going" would seem to be more accurate from the point of view of meaning as well as direct translation, yet it is the one option disallowed.

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          Yeah, it is the direct, but in "standard English" (outside some local variants) a person cannot really "be going well", not in this sense. A project can go well, but not a person, IMO.

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asher-H

          Ok, here is a point of dispute. A person can "go", as in "How's it going?" "She's going well" is used all over Australia, eg. "How's she going?" "She's going well!" In fact, it's used more than "She's feeling well" or "She's doing well". You might have to take my word for this. And it seems to work the same way in German, however, "She's going well", although correct, is not allowed as an answer. Are there any refinements on the meaning of "geht" that might make the difference here?

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          I wasn't trying to argue, that you couldn't say that (especially in Australia), just that it isn't "standard" English.

          The lessons are based on US English, although some common UK variants are also accepted.

          The difference you are missing, is that there is no "she" in the German sentence. There is the dative "ihr", which means "(to) her". The construct, although looking similar to the Australian one, is not at all the same.

          July 28, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanSebast557271

          I have a question here, isn't "Ihr" a dative posesive pronoun? and as i recall this lesson is only accusative. Sometimes duolinguo confuses the student

          May 11, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          Where did we learn that Ihr means more than just you (plural)? What is this dative case everyone's talking about? Is there some lesson I'm missing?

          August 10, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Are you using a mobile app? In that case, you're missing out on all the lesson notes.

          August 10, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          I am using the browser but these past few lessons have had like 2 sentence notes. I don't remember seeing anywhere that Ihr can also mean she

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwinPeaksOwl

          You are right, this is the grammar that hasn't been taught to us yet. It will be explained in further lessons. It has to do with Dative case, the third out of four cases in German.

          Sometimes Duolingo does introduce new grammar or words ahead of time. It must be some sort of a bug. Actually, it hasn't happened to me a lot in German course, but it does happen constantly in Spanish.

          May 3, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie.C

          Does "Es geht ihr gut" also work? If not, is it with wrong grammar or it's just nobody says it this way?

          November 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Both are possible and both are heard.

          November 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonWaschenReyes

          I understand as you go it well but i dont get it the structure well i mean the translate and the multi interprtation doesnt gonna with the class before

          May 10, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          "Ihr geht es gut" literally means: "to her it is going good", so it really isn't that complicated and to some extent makes sense even in English.

          It is THE way to express "how are you doing?" and therefore a very important phrase to learn. "Wie geht's (dir)?" is the question you normally hear and the usually expected reply is: "Es geht mir gut, und dir?"

          "Ihr" is the dative of "sie" (her) and therefore the meaning is "to her" as in for example: "Ich gebe ihr die Blumen" - "I give the flowers to her".

          May 10, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxez.hl

          I thought " ihr " means "you" or " her " and here it means " she "!!!! How is that ??

          July 19, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

          It means "(to) her" here (it is in dative), but in English you do not use such a construction "to her it is going good", so it gets translated to "she".

          July 19, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MihajloMit2

          Duolingo, please, PLEASE start making difference between dative and accusative. I find too many dative examples in accusative-related lessons and vice versa. PLEASE FOR GOD'S SAKE.

          May 11, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FosterDeutsch

          I suppose I cannot say "Sie geht es gut" ? It literally means the same thing, but probably does not sound right in German, since coincidentally, you cannot say "Ich bin gut". You have to say "Mir geht es gut".

          Am I right in thinking along these lines?

          But if I am not correct, why must "Ihr" be used here to describe "she" ? Is it because "Ihr" is the dative pronoun and is required with "geht"?

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          I suppose I cannot say "Sie geht es gut" ?

          That's right, you cannot.

          It literally means the same thing

          Only in the sense that Me am fine "literally means the same thing" as I am fine, and I spoke to he "literally means the same thing" as I spoke to him.

          You chose a completely different case for the pronoun -- I'm not sure how you can say that it still means the same thing.

          In fact, it means nothing at all, just as "Me am fine" and "I spoke to he" mean nothing at all.

          why must "Ihr" be used here to describe "she" ? Is it because "Ihr" is the dative pronoun and is required with "geht"?

          That's right -- the es geht ... (gut/schlecht/etc.) template requires the dative case for the "..." part.

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          When he says it is literally the same thing, he means the one of the first things we learned was that "er" means he and "sie" means she. "Ihr" and "sie" are not the same in Germn, but if you were to translate both to English, they would both translate to "she"

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          I think you mean they would both translate to "her"?

          ich sehe sie und gebe ihr das Buch "I see her and give her the book"

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          I think it can be both. "Ihr geht es gut" - She is well, "Sie mag die Blumen" - she likes the flowers

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          "Ihr geht es gut" literally translates to something like "to-her goes it well".

          The subject is "it" (but that doesn't really have a meaning -- perhaps "the circumstances as a whole"?). A bit like "Things are going well for her", perhaps.

          August 21, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          Thank you for the clarification. It all makes a lot more sense now

          August 21, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Ihr geht es gut doesn't translate literally to English, so that's a bit misleading.

          es geht and gefallen and fehlen and a few other verbs have subject and object swapped in English compared to German.

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan34557

          How so? I'm not understanding how "es geht" would change the meaning. I guess I just don't understand what "geht" means in this case. Isn't it just a state of being like "she is 'doing' well"?

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FosterDeutsch

          I chose two phrases on purpose with the same essential meaning to try to understand the difference. Wasn't making mistakes on purpose.

          August 20, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaulZapata6

          this translation has no sense for me! Why "she" instead of "you"?

          September 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Because es geht ... takes the dative case (e.g. es geht mir gut with dative mir).

          ihr means "you" if it's in the nominative case -- e.g. ihr esst "you are eating".

          But ihr is also the dative case of sie "she". It's not the dative case of ihr "you" (that would be euch).

          So in this sentence, in the es geht context, ihr can only mean "she", as the dative of sie.

          September 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaulZapata6

          Danke!!

          September 5, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva199403

          how to figure out that this ihr is not you but it should be she?

          September 26, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          By looking at the case.

          The template es geht ... gut requires the dative case for the person who is doing well, so ihr has to be in the dative case.

          That means it must be the dative case of sie "she", as that's the only thing ihr can mean in the dative case.

          September 26, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keskelis

          Isn't "ihr" you?

          November 2, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          That's one meaning of the word, but it can't mean that in this sentence.

          ihr geht by itself could mean "you (all) are going", but ihr geht es gut = "you are going it well" isn't something we would usually say.

          So ihr here is not the nominative (subject) case form of the personal pronoun ihr (you), but rather the dative (indirect object) case form of the personal pronoun sie (she) -- ihr geht es gut (literally, "to her it goes well") = she is doing fine, she is well.

          November 3, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magda316414

          I think it is corect : Sie geht es gut ...for the translation She is well , because Ihr is on dativ...

          December 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Ihr geht es gut with dative ihr is correct. The formal subject of the sentence is es.

          Sie geht es gut is not correct.

          German uses a different construction from English here.

          December 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiFox

          I think the Duolingo app should have the skill explanation with the skill like the website does

          January 19, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          I agree.

          It would save learners a lot of frustration and would hopefully also reduce a lot of redundant questions here in the sentence discussions.

          January 19, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DashaZhada1

          Is geht a noun? If it is, could this mean "her health is good"?

          March 5, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          No, geht is not a noun.

          And ihr is not a possessive adjective here; it's a dative personal pronoun.

          For example, "He is doing well" would be Ihm geht es gut and not Sein geht es gut.

          It's just confusing here because ihr can be either personal or possessive (like "her" in English).

          March 5, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArifKazi

          Why not Sie for she

          June 10, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwinPeaksOwl

          The phrase "(somebody) geht es gut" requires Dative for the somebody in question. Dative of sie (she) is ihr. So it's "Ihr geht es gut." It will never be "Sie geht es gut" because no pronoun turns to sie in Dative. Unless of course Sie is someone's name :)

          June 11, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrFebro

          From Duolingo Tips of this section: So, if you see einen, meinen, unseren and so forth with a singular noun, you will know two things:

          the noun is masculine the noun is in the accusative case (probably the object of the sentence) Consider this example:

          Meinen Hund mag die Frau nicht.

          August 16, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nancy783127

          Does anyone else think the male voice sounds really, really irritated when you hit the turtle button?

          August 22, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meenu418718

          Ihr geht es gut...wht not ihr should mean "you" here

          September 20, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Because ihr is in the dative case here -- and there it means "(to) her".

          The pattern es geht ... gut requires the dative case for the "..." part.

          ihr means "you" in the nominative case, but not in the dative case.

          September 20, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandy.Greg

          I find that they are using ihr to mean you, he or she. I am not sure why it differs. I'm not seeing anything in the verb tense to distinguish

          September 25, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nancy783127

          Ihr means you (plural) when it is in the nominative case (subject of the sentence):

          Ihr mögt Äpfel. [You (plural) like apples.]

          When Ihr=You is the subject of the sentence, the verb is conjugated by removing the -en ending and adding -t. So:

          Ihr mögt ... Ihr geht ... Ihr lebt ... Ihr lest ... Ihr wohnt ...

          And so on.

          A second situation in which you will see "ihr" is meaning "her" in the dative case. So for example:

          Ich gebe ihr das Buch. [I am giving her the book.]

          Ihr geht es gut. [She's fine. Note that having the form of "she" in the dative case in this construction is a German idiom. You just have to learn it. The actual subject of the sentence is "es" and the sentence could be written as "Es geht ihr gut" with the same meaning. The verb here is conjugated according to its subject, es.]

          Ich helfe ihr. [I am helping her.]

          Das ist zwischen ihm und ihr. [That is between him and her.]

          The last situation in which you will see "ihr" is as a possessive adjective meaning "her":

          Ihr Kleid ist schön. [Her dress is pretty.]

          Ihr Mann ist schön. [Her husband is handsome.]

          Ich habe ihr Auto. [I have her car.]

          Note that the possessive "ihr" will only be seen attached to masculine nouns in the nominative case, and to neuter nouns in the nominative and accusative cases. Otherwise, it would have an ending.

          Ihre Freundin ist schön. [Her friend is pretty.]

          "Ihr" never means "he".

          September 25, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vedran161284

          And ihr is now she. Really, German?

          November 1, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Because the construction in German takes the dative while in English, this concept is expressed differently and the experiencer is the subject.

          November 1, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akpqrTXy

          sie geht es gut she is doing well ?!?? ihr geht es gut you are well ?!?!!

          November 18, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          No.

          es geht ... gut / ... geht es gut requires the dative case for the "..." part.

          So for "she is doing well", you need ihr (the dative case form of sie), while for "you (all) are doing well", you need euch (the dative case form of ihr).

          November 19, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaorioM

          If She is well is Ihr geht es gut, so why I am well is Mir geht es gut. Shouldn't it be Mich geht es gut?

          December 19, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          No -- es geht ... gut uses the dative case for the "...", as in ihr and mir, not sie and mich.

          December 19, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anita512877

          Isnt Ihr like you (plural familiar).. where is she coming from?..i thought she is like sie.. or even if ihr is her for demonstrative pronoun...the statement just doesnt correlate..'her is well' or her is fine'.

          March 3, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          Isnt Ihr like you (plural familiar)

          In the nominative case, yes: ihr means "you (plural familiar)".

          Here, though, ihr is in the dative case (as required by the es geht ... gut template) -- that means it is the dative case form of sie "she".

          You can't translate the two sentences word for word, because English expresses this idea differently.

          March 3, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skeletolgod

          Wait wtf I though Ihr was just plural you

          March 26, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          I though Ihr was just plural you

          Not just -- ihr can mean all sorts of things depending on the case it's in and whether or not it's before a noun, I'm afraid.

          See https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/21721534$comment_id%3D23831061

          March 26, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimHarks

          I think you understand it better if you litterly translate it to "(with) her goes it well" That just makes more sense to me

          August 6, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xanderclue

          How did this end up in the accusative section? Neither "ihr" nor "es" is accusative in this sentence. "Ihr" is dative, and "es" is actually nominative in this example.

          August 7, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          How did this end up in the accusative section?

          The words were picked incorrectly when the sentence was created (using nominative ihr and accusative es instead of dative ihr and nominative es).

          I've tried to move it to the "dative pronouns" section.

          August 8, 2019
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