"That Brit likes beer."

Translation:Cette Anglaise aime bien la bière.

3/31/2013, 8:04:57 PM

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/womble89

Why is "Anglais" an alternative to "Bitannique"? When Anglais is specifically "English" and Britannique could be used to describe someone from Scotland or Wales and not just England.

8/16/2013, 12:22:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CTrinity
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I agree. They are not synonyms. An English person is also a Brit, but not all Brits are English.

8/29/2013, 4:22:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kmburkezoo

Probably because Americans, at least, don't usually make the distinction.

12/19/2013, 11:44:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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I'm an American and I make the distinction.

2/4/2014, 6:15:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SMGadbois

We make the distinction.

2/12/2014, 11:32:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
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It's also odd that "Brit," a casual or slang term, is mixed in here and translated as "Anglais," or "Brittannique" by Duolingo. Check here for it's derivation: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=Brit&searchmode=none

I translated "Brit" as "Brit." It's slang, like "Aussie" or "Canuck." If I had to to translate "Canuck" I'd do it directly, with perhaps a footnote — "Canuck" est I'argot pour Canadian," etc. Otherwise we could innocently be rude to others, or use the slang in formal communication.

I have no problem with slang, it's just confusing when Duolingo mashes it all together.

3/20/2014, 9:11:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/henrydwatson

I agree. The correct term is 'Briton'. 'Brit' is a word that I personally take offence to.

6/17/2014, 4:33:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyFrench

Wow, thanks for that as I did not realize the term can be viewed as offensive.

6/24/2014, 12:39:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
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Í asked an educated man from England (Devonshire) if the term "Brit" offended him and he replied tha he was not in the least offended by that. A lot of gray/grey areas in life alas.

6/24/2014, 3:53:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/henrydwatson

It's not that I find it a great offensive term, it's just like calling an American a 'Yank'. It's not proper, it isn't very nice or respectful.

6/24/2014, 5:02:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
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I too don't think it's offensive. However, just as "Yank" or a "Canuck" is slang for an American or Canadian person, so "Brit" is slang for an English person. "Un anglais" is an English person, a "Brit" is...a "Brit."

"Un(e) Americain(e)" can be a "yank" but a translation of the former term would be "an American." (As an aside, this can also be a contentious term, as Canadians and Mexicans are also North Americans, but the term "American" is relegated to people from the U.S. Older Spanish-English Pimsleur's tapes instructed learners to translate "I am American" as "Soy Norte Americano," but Mexicans/Canadians were to say "Soy canadiense/mexicano." In such ways our culture blinds us to our prejudices.)

6/24/2014, 8:28:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Oakwood
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Oui, l'anglais aime la bière chaude.

3/31/2013, 8:04:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/athalaberhtaz
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La bière chaude a un gôut de pisse :|

6/9/2014, 4:30:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SRC1993

oui, mais soulement pour les ales

3/28/2014, 11:06:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHazard
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Et leur pain grillé froid!

Mais la bière trop froide est comme des eaux marécageuses stagnantes. :0

6/24/2014, 8:45:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SDL_1987
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ce Brit aime de la bière = not ok, why?

7/3/2013, 8:38:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gpriddy
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I wrote the same thing. Let me know if you know.

8/20/2013, 8:15:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kmburkezoo

"aimer" is one of those verbs where you use the article to indicate you like it as a whole category. "de la bière" is "some beer," and while I don't think it would carry quite the same meaning as "ce Brit aime certaines de bière(s?)", it still sounds funny.

12/19/2013, 11:49:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/multirodent

"aime bien" also correct for "likes": how freaking come? Wot am I missing out on?

4/14/2013, 1:56:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

Aime and aime bien just describe different levels of affection. Aime is closer to love while aime bien is more like your attitude towards a preferred hobby.

3/19/2014, 3:41:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ya_ar
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What is the difference between "ce" and "cet"?

4/16/2013, 4:53:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamsanks
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Both "ce" and "cet" are are used when the noun is masculine, but if the noun starts with a vowel, use "cet". For example: "Ce garçon" and "Cet ami". Sorry you've had to wait so long for a reply.

5/18/2013, 9:31:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/azoolkool

To add onto what Bamsanks said, it is also used with some H words, such as "homme." You would said "J'aime cet homme," because homme uses an "H aspiré."

http://french.about.com/od/pronunciation/a/h_3.htm

Using "cet" makes it a lot more flowing than "ce homme," for sure.

6/12/2013, 4:54:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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homme uses an H muet (silent h) (héros uses an h aspiré (aspirate) - ce heros)

3/7/2014, 8:36:57 PM
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