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"I have lost my wife and have to recover my son."

Translation:He perdido a mi esposa y tengo que recuperar a mi hijo.

0
5 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/billyhaigh

Who's writing this? Liam Neeson?

176
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan657758
Jonathan657758
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No sé quién es usted... No sé lo qué quiere... Si quiere un rescate, lo puedo decir que no tengo dinero. Lo que sí tengo... son habilidades especiales. Habilidades que son una pesadilla para usted. Si usted suelta a mi hijo, que será el fin. Pero, si no... Voy a buscarte... Voy a encontrarte... Y voy a matarte...

93
Reply62 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonWeiss2

That gave me a good laugh!

12
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super_Duo_Lingo
Super_Duo_Lingo
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¡Padre, perdóname porque has pecado!

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Ok, I'll be the one to say it. FINDING NEMO!

65
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Darn right

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

He's having one heck of a day.

36
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

Tricky! Two different uses of the English "have."

33
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lastrtelusnet

In this example I do not understand why "a" mi esposa and "a" mi hijo is required? Would someone be so kind as to help me here, please?

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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It's called the personal "a", and is always used when the object is a person (or personified animal like a pet).

47
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MemoriaJam
MemoriaJam
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Specifically when the DIRECT object is animate or personified.

14
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RathgarTheUgly

I've lost my wife, but it's my son I actually care about.

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knickknacks12

Or maybe his wife is already dead so he's focusing on his son instead.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dreamfeed1
dreamfeed1
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Fallout 4

7
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerkeslager

Why is "marido" a thing, but "marida" isn't?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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I've asked a Spanish friend. He says it's just what it is, no such word as marida! But Esposa is ok.

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roy_Bar
Roy_Bar
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Why debo insteed of tengo?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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It's 'debo' or 'tengo que'. If you were corrected, it might have been that you left the 'que' off (and Duo responds with the last translation in its list).

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/200709709
200709709
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is it the case that complement is unanimate then no "a", like "recuperar su dinero"? If the complement is animate, then add "a" in front,like "recuperar a mi hijo"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Yes. When the object is a human or a pet receives the personal 'a'. Otherwise the personal 'a' is avoided. It took some time to sink in, coz your pet dog receives an 'a', while a wild dog that's chasing you, doesn't. :^)

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
HeruMornie
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That is a great explanation, thank you!

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bozoforpresident

I don't understand the proper use of 'He' at the beginning of the sentence.

1
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew41404

it means "i have", there are different words for "you have" "we have" stuff like that

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lastrtelusnet

Ahhhh... gracias mi amigo.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debbie.ste2

What is wrong with Recobrar for Recover? To me, Recuperar is more to recover from an illness.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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The top definition for recuperar is recoup, to recover something lost or missing.

The top definition for recobrar is recover (confidence, health).

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meeks1991

I understand the present perfect with the 'he' have, but what gives with the 'tengo', shouldn't that be 'he' too? Thanks

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Hi. I believe this is one of the sentences that helps us learn the difference between the past perfect and the obligation versions of the 'have' constructs. In spanish, there is no confusion because we have 2 different set of words for that.

"I have lost my wife"- refers to the past perfect tense of 'lose'. Meaning, the act of losing happened very recently. Hence the 'he' "I have to recover my son"- refers to the obligation. Meaning, he must recover his son; he is obliged to. Hence the 'tengo'.

Hope this helps.

12
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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'Have to' is 'tener que'. Don't leave off the que, or it means possession.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meeks1991

Thanks! Great answer - this cleared it up a lot for me.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan523248

Someone is having a rough day. Yet, it is better than: Había muerto toda mi familia

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/do-yo-kno_da_wae

Fallout 4 reference!? O.•

0
Reply8 months ago