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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steveharveylol

в р е м я

i've been getting into the realm of watching Russian tv lately, and i couldn't help but notice that whenever they announce whenever some program is scheduled to come on, they do it in military time. is this normal for everyday speech or do only formal settings use military time?

September 26, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exp271828

Not a native Russian, so I can't say for sure. However, I think that use of a 24 hour clock (what you're calling military time) is much more common in Europe than it is in the US.

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrrael

From the Netherlands, here, and we use it, as well.

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herr_Wald

the form HH:MM is used everywhere. In usual talking it sound 'девять (часов) утра/дня/вечера/ночи' и 'девять минут девятого' if your companion know period of a day

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gatiquo

Many countries use the 24 hour cycle.

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuri352061

This reminded me of an old joke. An announcement on the Russian radio: "Moscow time is twelve o'clock. That is twelve hundred for the military or two arrows upwards for idiots".

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exp271828

I think that joke works just about anywhere, at least among people who know about analog clocks (chuckle).

... kind of far afield, but when I was studying Russian (long, long ago), I knew one of my classmates as Yuri - and that would be the kind of joke he would say also!

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_____http-414990

пишем по русски?

September 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

I would say, it is the US military that use the Russian style. :)

October 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuri352061

Another military joke "If it moves; salute it. If it doesn't move paint it gray. " :)

October 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noncompliant_Egg

Might be worth noting also that when Russian speakers do use 12-hour time, they usually refer to "day" or "night" based off of whether it is day-time or night-time, as opposed to AM or PM as we do in English

So if it is 3:00AM, in English we would say "3'o'clock in the morning", whereas Russian speakers would probably say "3'o'clock at night".

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

That's right but not universal. Some refer to 3am as 3 o'clock in the morning. There's even a joke regarding that vagueness:

-- Meet me at 6 o'clock.
-- Six in the morning or six in the evening?
-- Six in the day!

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noncompliant_Egg

Hahah, I like that! And good point, by no means universal - just something I noticed was more prevalent than in English when travelling in Russia.

October 6, 2018
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