"Where is the library's cat today?"

Translation:Cá bhfuil cat na leabharlainne inniu?

September 26, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory743155

How would you write 'Where is a cat of the library' ?

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Piptobismol

Just guessing here.. but perhaps "Cá bhfuil an cat leabharlainne?" ?

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It would use the partitive dative — Cá bhfuil cat den leabharlann? .

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

That really stumped me. So here's the elaboration that I found on nualeargais.ie: "one can choose to form this by a definite noun of the partitive dative with the preposition de + article ( in German there would be here rather the partitive genitive!). This is especially so if the first noun should remain indefinite:  e.g.: cuid den airgead = a share of the money("part of the money"), ceathrú den úll = quarter of the apple ("from the apple"), roinnt de na fir = some of the men ("share of the men")

The partitive dative ist always necessary, if both nouns are definite (also here one would use the genitive in German): mo chuid den airgead = my share of the money ("my part of the money")".

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

I think the clue here is that in Irish, the dative has another function from the standard one in Indo-European languages. "Sometimes the dative has functions unrelated to giving. In Scottish Gaelic and Irish, the term dative case is used in traditional grammars to refer to the prepositional case-marking of nouns following simple prepositions and the definite article. " (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dative_case)

"In Irish and Scottish Gaelic, nouns that are the objects of (most) prepositions may be marked with prepositional case, especially if preceded by the definite article. In traditional grammars, and in scholarly treatments of the early language, the term dative case is incorrectly used for the prepositional case. This case is exclusively associated with prepositions. " (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prepositional_case)

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darzinho

What's the difference between inniú and inniu?

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1188

It the same as the difference between "todax" and "today".

"Todax" and "inniú" are not valid words.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darzinho

Yep, completely true, but I think there might also be a little bit more to it than that. There was an Irish language newspaper called Inniú and it meant 'Today'. I'm wondering if it was something unique to one of the dialects that was dropped.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1188

According to Wikipedia, Inniú was founded in 1943, while the spelling reforms of the 1940s were still underway. Inniu is a reformed spelling, and it's possible that inniú represented an early attempt at a reformed spelling, and when the official reformed spellings were released, they decided not to rename the publication.

That's just a guess on my part - Dineen didn't have either inniu or inniiú in his dictionary.

May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1188

Scratch that - according to these images of issues from the 1960s, the publication was call Inniu, without a fada.

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/Inniu-Irish-Language-Newspaper-1963-67-Nuallain/4777398315/bd

May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TatianaBoshenka

I would ask rather, "Where is the cat whose library this is?"

September 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

What exactly does 'strong plural' mean? I had understood it to mean simultaneously: 1. that npl. had a proper suffix, i.e. not only í(the) tagged on and 2. that gpl. would be identical to npl. (rather than ns.).

But now I see for ns. leabharlann: 1. npl. leabharlanna and 2. gpl. leabharlann. So does leabharlann have a 'strong plural'?

July 30, 2019
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