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"Le gusta romper cosas."

Translation:She likes to break things.

5 years ago

108 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WackyJack

No rompes mi corazon, mi achy breaky corazon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

Jajaja!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGreatAce

Bull in a china shop defined.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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Sounds like "Me gusta..." .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyNameIsHuman

Rompas***

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

Simplemente no creo que entienda.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnobled

I put "he likes breaking things" and it was wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

She would not be an ideal person to hire to work in a china shop.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HJMcDonald1

I put" It pleases him to break things" and it was wrong. Le gusta, me gusta, translates to it pleases him, it pleases me. I think that is the same as he likes, I like. And I don't think that it a wrong translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

"Me gusta" means "I like." While you are technically correct, we're supposed to translate the Spanish to what we would say in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7895123G
7895123G
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It is not what we would say in English but in DuoLingo English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

The Dulingo sentence do not exist for the sake of learning translation but only to provide us with an understanding about what the corresponding Spanish serntences MEAN and when we apply them to that usage they serve very well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Duo may have accepted a little closer translation of "Breaking things pleases him." But I haven't tried that yet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Maybe duolingo would not accept the "to break" = "breaking" here. File a report if you get the sentence again.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

rocko2012: Actually 'to break' means in English that he likes to pick up plates and smash them. The sentence 'I like breaking things' can be construed as 'he like things that are in the act of being broken'. I (subject,) like (v), breaking (adj), things (direct object). I like to watch breaking news on TV.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

It's to break not breaking

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It can be either. If you translate the English gerund 'breaking' in this sentence back to Spanish it becomes, 'Le gusta romper cosas'. Equally, 'I like playing/to play tennis' would be 'Me gusta jugar al tenis'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

Correct on 13th July 2014

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

I don't think that's an incorrect translation...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbwel

breaking is "rompimiento" vs. romper, the infinitive "to break".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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In my opinion, it's too litteral, and word-to-word. I don't think you can translate "breaking" by "rompimiento" in this sentence. Because the use of gerondive in English and in Spanish is different. The use of the gerondive in English is allowed by the grammar structure "to like" +ing. (2 verbs are following each other), but I don't think "he likes to break things" is different from "he likes breaking things", it's just a different grammatical structure in my opinion, it doesn't mean there's a ongoing action.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerenkug

this one is about my cat

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Sounds like my 3 year old daughter

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hammer7777777

It likes to break things - should be accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greg_Kahuna

Since 'cosas' is plural, shouldn't 'gustan' be used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

I think it's singular because it's the act of breaking things (a single type of action) that is pleasing to her, not the things themselves (which would have been plural).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabenpor
jabenpor
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she likes to her, they like to them, le gusta a ella, les gustan a ellas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynwood234

i don't understand how it can be "her" since they used le and no feminine pronoun. I would be more it or he.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Le" can mean "to him/her/it/you."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

why not "it likes to break things" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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That should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagneTufte

It was accepted 20180131

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiloMcS

Un elefante en una cacharrería?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ps104
ps104
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Le gusta romper cosas ( a usted, a el y a ella).It' s correct. She like , he likes and you like

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrevorForeplay

What is the function of le in this sentence? I only get hung up on le and se....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

Le is an Indirect Object. In Spanish, the Indirect Objects are me, te, le, nos, and os. For the verb gustar , you will always need an Indirect Object. You don't say "gusto" you say "me gusta". Because of the actual definition of the verb. Now, as for " le" and "se", they are the same thing, but you need to use " se" in front of another object pronoun that starts with L. Mira... "He gives it to them." "Él se lo/la (a ellos)." This was done in Spanish grammar to avoid a confusing double L sound. Any questions, comment here and I'll help if I can. You got this! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeGOgletree
LeeGOgletree
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Thanks, good job clarifying!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaredlarlham1

Breaks arm

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

destructive tendencies much?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Musician

She needs to be put in a mental institution.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnobled

How would you say, "He like breaking things?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I assume the same way or you could clarify it. "A él le gusta romper cosas". I'm not sure though.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajabrams

Correct. Same sentence with just a qualifier.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Sorry, I don't get it. There's no difference normally between "he likes to break things" and "he likes breaking things"? Why do you need to put "a él" to translate the "ing" thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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The "a él" wouldn't represent "ing"... if present it would be there to signify that it's "he" that likes breaking things (as opposed to she or you). Without it you have to reply on context to know who is the vandal. Personally, in this situation I'd think that either "to break" or "breaking" are suitable translations of the meaning of the sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Yeah I agree those are the same. Duolingo's sentence translates it to "she" and I was merely pointing out you can use the same Spanish for "he" and "she" or you can add clarification to state it is "he" unambiguously.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjkemp

It would be incorrect to say "He like." http://www.verb2verbe.com/conjugation/english-verb/like.aspx

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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In the link you have given, which I see is French/English, only 'she likes' is shown, for some reason. 'He/she likes' = both 'likes'. 'He like' is not correct.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

I wrote, "You like to break things". Nothing wrong with that, right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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Should it not have been "Le gusta romper cosas a usted" for your translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

Why would my sentence need to specified as "a usted", yet for the "correct" translation here, it's not specified as "a ella"? If anything, leaving it unspecified would lead me to believe that "you" is the best translation since we don't know the gender of the 3rd person.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

In that case it would have been Le gusta romper cosas a ella. for thiers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

Excuse me, theirs

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

That would be correct, but they didn't include "a ella". And their 'correct' translation has "she", but not "you" or "he"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebrill

I, too, used "she" instead of "you". Both should be correct if the pronoun isn't specified.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allinuse
Allinuse
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It would be "la" if it was "she". Anyway, "he" is the correct one. You would be "te".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djterasaki

Hmm. this was multiple choice for me and 'she' was included even though the pronoun was 'le'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjkemp

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/17

This should shed a bit of light on: Indirect object pronouns (me, te, le, nos, os, les)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djterasaki

ahh... thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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What's the difference with "he likes to break down things"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

You might want to say: A él le gusta desmantelar cosas.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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Breaking down things, or more commonly breaking things down, would mean taking them apart, disassembling, folding up - it would be orderly and by design. it's hard to imagine somebody who likes to do that, but certainly odder things have happened on here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barry_boettger

I agree. My brother likes nothing better than to carefully take apart anything that has components for projects you can get out of electronics magazines....T.V., microwaves, computers, etc. all have parts you can use to build something else with.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abigailtrue

I was taught that when you want to use the third person "le gusta" you had to introduce the subject (ie ella, el, sandra, ud.) as it's not implicitly described as would be "me gusta".. but obviously this is only a formality? just wondering :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

In context, which is totally missing in DL's isolated sentences, you would probably know who is "liking" something. Then, you wouldn't need to add the "a él, a ella, etc." unless there might be some confusion about it. "A mi familia le gusta ir de vacaciones. A mi hermano le gusta ir a las montañas, pero me gusta ir a la playa." (My family likes to go on vacation. My brother likes to go to the mountains, but I like going to the beach.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabenpor
jabenpor
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why not to break items

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelrev33
joelrev33
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I think romper also can mean to tear, like ripping or tearing a piece of paper. No rompes el papel. Dont tear/rip the paper

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

'It' likes to break things? Mi puño!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minutewaltz

"Uno de esos es mi corazon." Am I qualified enough to be dramatic in spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EgwuekweChima

Please... Can someone translate this sentence for me: 'my laptop spoilt or got broken last week'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Mi computadora portátil se rompió la semana pasada." My laptop broke last week. Try these for translations:
http://www.spanishdict.com/translation
https://translate.google.com/#en/es/My%20laptop%20broke%20last%20week.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catherine.539406

Why does it offer she instead if he?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Le" can mean "to him/her/it/you." (Remember that "gustar" sentences like this are backwards. Literally it would translate to: Breaking things is pleasing to someone.) Exactly who the "le" refers to could be cleared up by adding an introductory phrase such as "A él/ella/usted le gusta romper cosas." In this case, Duo chose not to do this, and since there is no context, you can take your pick: He/She/You/It(?) like(s) to break things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

is like similar to want?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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No it isn't. To want is 'querer'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RafaelRodr3

Its my understanding that "romper" means to rip or tear whereas "quebrar" means to break. I know in Mexico quebrar is used exclusively for break and the 2 verbs are NOT interchangeable. Don't know if this is the same in Spain. I put "It likes to rip/tear things" and it was wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clarkeve

Can't you just put "rip"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RafaelRodr3

I tried putting rip and tear and both were wrong. Idk. The way I was taught, romper is rip/tear. Quebrar is break. My professor seems to think they can be used interchangeably. They may use it that way in Spain but I know in Texas and Mexico they are different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clarkeve

Yup... it's kind of confusing...:-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deen14

so destructive

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ben467423

This applies to my cat perfectly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MessyJessie103

I just thought of Wreck-it Ralph. That movie came out so long ago!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceHilto2

Anger issues

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidrosa.tt

Romperskitsofrinic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Davidrosa, Romperskitsofrintic sounds like a good online name! HA!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshleeToml

me 2

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeniseLedb

I put "She likes to break things" and it marked it wrong. How should I have known it was he, not she?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/surfirie

If "cosas" is plural, then why is it not "le gustan romper cosas." ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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"romper cosas" as a phrase is the subject of gustar here, and that is singular. The pluralness of "cosas" is embedded in that phrase, but doesn't extend outside of it. If you had multiple phrases, like "he likes to break things and fix them", it might be gustan, but I'm not 100% about that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoranGoranovic

especially when I make her mad ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pkh97

Today it says the correct answer is "It likes to break things."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drstevens14
drstevens14
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Al loro de mi suegra le gusta romper cosas...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

He likes to brake things Is not accepted

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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Probably because you did not spell 'break' correctly. Romper = to break; frenar = to brake; el freno = the (vehicle) brake

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol870492

How do you know that it's a she? Only by context? which we don't have.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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I new to all of this.

Since "Ella" is she, why isn't the sentence, "Ella gusta romper cosas."?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

Esto es la policia de antes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimZTango
JimZTango
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Esta es la política de antes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmoylan13

It's just one of those days

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaniWhovian
DaniWhovian
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Le gusta romper bolas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagease

I like trains.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Violent guy...

3 years ago