"I keep bread in my bag."

Translation:Saya menyimpan roti di tas saya.

September 29, 2018

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi

My answer is IDENTICAL to the correct answer but this BLOODY THING keeps telling me it's incorrect and underlines the "Say" part of "Saya".… WTF?????

September 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rick392366

If your answer is identical, then it should be accepted.
Your answer probably looked like this :

Saya menyimpan roti di tasku.
Aku menyimpan roti di tas saya.

A combination of saya & aku is awkward/clunky/strange.
It's currently not on the list of accepted answers.

September 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi

Thanks for your quick feedback Rick! My memory tells me that the whole sentence was identical, but probably I wrote the first of the above two sentences.

In this instance it makes perfect sense the way you explained, if you used "Saya" you wouldn't use "ku" and vice versa - although I must point out that such ARE expected for the majority of the sentences, so it hurts the consistency a bit.

Where I really get frustrated is the sentences where there are two verbs and Duo is insisting to have one of them without the "me" - or with it without any explainable reason. I understand that for a native speaker it might come "natural" but - at least for me so far - there seem to be no "rule" to this... What am I missing (I did report one or two such cases recently)?

September 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rick392366

Regarding 'saya' & 'aku, ýes it's already being used in a mixed way in many sentence translations.
To be honest, I'm not a fan of that, but it's already there in many translations.

The same applies to the use of the me- prefix.
That's also something that needs to be fixed to make it more consistent.

For some verbs the me- prefix is required, simply because the base word is not an active verb, so you must use the me- prefix to make it an active verb.
For other verbs, the me- prefix can be omitted and is also omitted (rarely used) in colloquial/everyday speech.

For example , in the formal (written) style 'aku' is not used, and the verbs will always use the appropriate affixes.
However, in the informal/colloquial everyday speech, the affixes are often dropped.
They're not only dropped, it's even more than that, there are other affixes in the colloquial style.
But that's a completely different story altogether.

September 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lims41

What is an "active" verb?

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rick392366

An active transitive verb has a 'passive' counterpart.
An active transitive verb has a direct object in an active sentence.
If the active sentence is converted into a passive sentence, then this direct object functions as the subject if the passive sentence.

Example:
'simpan' (base word) (base word is a verb).
'simpan' + 'me-' prefix ==> 'menyimpan' (active transitive verb)
'simpan' + 'di-' prefix ==> 'disimpan' (passive verb)

'Tini menyimpan roti di tas' (active sentence)
'Roti disimpan di tas oleh Tini' (passive sentence)

Here is a topic about transitive verbs :
https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/29750515

Here is a Tinycards deck with more examples:
https://tinycards.duolingo.com/decks/7WhWoLQQ/verbs-bahasa-indonesia

Here is another Tinycards deck with transitive verbs (me-kan & me-i) :
https://tinycards.duolingo.com/decks/7XFDuU2w/me-kan-me-i-bahasa-indonesia

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/grasmi

Thanks - good explanation - I had the same issue.

November 24, 2018
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