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"Mi hija es mesera."

Translation:My daughter is a waitress.

4 years ago

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Martel13

why no 'una'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darkshadow117

Because professions in spanish don't require una or un.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KamaelSoul

Couple examples later I got "Él es un mesero y un actor." Why there is UN here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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I think Darkshadow117 put it well: articles are not required for professions, i.e. you can optionally use them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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unless it doesn't have an adjective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NevilleMit

Just as in "Soy mesero" = I am a waiter ; they sufficiently used "es mesera" in this statement

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fomat

why can't it be waiter instead of waitress? We never differentiate between the two in English

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lcaycee
lcaycee
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"mesero" ending in O is masculine= waiter "mesera" ending in A is feminine= waitress

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imst

Waitress is not the only acceptable way to refer to a female in that profession in English. Where I live, it's extremely rare to gender that term.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Well, this is a Spanish lesson, not an English PC platform. Mesera means waitress, and it is as simple as that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borQhuester

I am native American, have worked in restaurants, and would identify the female who take my order and bring food at the restaurant as 'waitress', and the male fulfilling the same function as 'waiter'. In some restaurants, they are called 'servers' (gender nonspecified) or may as a group be called 'wait staff'. Perhaps this is different in other English-speaking countries...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

bor....- Usa and Canada use waitress a lot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PansyPurple
PansyPurple
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..and in the UK too.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Depends on the level of PC in your area. Most of America would differentiate

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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That's what I said. Most would differentiate waiters and waitresses. We're in agreement, at least about what the actual majority practice is.

PC isn't all bad, it's just bad when it's taken to extremes, like most everything else in this world - but not all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerraZe
TerraZe
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Depending on where you live. Some old folks still use waitress, but it's falling out of use though. Waiter should be accepted though as it is now a gender neutral term, so report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

terraze- In Canada, we say waitress a lot

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerraZe
TerraZe
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Sorry, I should've said "where I am living" which was a different place then I am living now which uses waitress a lot also. It all depends on where you are really.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lgriffith89

@euguene i think what people are saying/asking is that if it is interchangeable if the person performing the job is male. not all people who serve tables are female

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly177410

We do differentiate between the two in english

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maceywright_

I always thought that waiter=male and wai(tress)=female

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esperanza.1994

Is mesera common in Latin America? I have always been taught to use the word camarera or camarero.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Yep. Much regional variety. In Argentina a waiter is a 'mozo'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eey91
Eey91Plus
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In Colombia for example we almost only use "mesero / a".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Anyone know what is used in Panama or Puerto Rico?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jparadise08

I always heard camarero/a in Puerto Rico

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseJajarm

Yes but here in spain we use camarero

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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  1. m. y f. Am. Cen., Bol., Chile, Col., Ec. y Méx. Camarero de café o restaurante.

In Central America, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador y México: mesero, mesera. In Spain: usually camarero, camarera. Mozo and moza is more informal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

What about Uruguay?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synthpopalooza
Synthpopalooza
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Tip: to remember this word, just think of someone who waits "tables". "Mesa" is "table" in Spanish, hence ... "mesera".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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Well, i have to know three languages... I am Italian, so, first, I traslate in english, and then in spsnish..... cool!!!! XD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

This discussion has turned into something way more than grammar, but perhaps as important! Cultural differences find themselves popping up in the way we talk, and we need to recognize them as well! I want to respond to Mr T's last post about "giving up". I think he finally lost his own argument with his example of "nurse", which he believes is a feminine word in English. Gotcha, Mr T! I guess nurses used to all be women, so there was no reason for a male version. But now, both men and women are called nurses in English, because what the heck can you do to make a masculine version of a word in use for centuries? And THAT is the where we're at. One word should be enough to define ANY profession. The value of a person's work should have nothing to do with their sex. In this way, the Spanish language is different. We learn it, we follow it. It has nothing to do with how we translate into English. We don't have teacheresses, doctoresses, lawyeresses, and we no longer have stewardesses in English. We will never have a Presidentess. Yes, Mr T, we will address a female president as Madame President, and a male as Mister President. (I'm beginning to like this old curmudgeon, but he's lost every argument. I'm a 76 year old curmudgeoness, so it's ok if I call him that!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nic.Williams

I'm not going to lie. I rarely say the word "waitress". I only say waiter and that's all I ever hear and I'm from Arkansas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamn133

Would it be wrong to say "Mi hija es una mesera"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gustafsson3

I was always taught camarera and camarero were waiters and waitresses, but mesera makes sense because Mesa is table.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnRhines

is the "a" an assumed word? I ask because I was expecting the word "un" or "una"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian845704

¡Exactamente JohnRhines! In English, the sentence translates to ..."a waitress" even though un/una (the indefinite article) is omitted.

This is the rule for all occupations in spanish. It's just the way it is.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.8cbe
.8cbe
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Yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefanpope67

I would like to know why you dont need "una" before mesera in this sentence aswell!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darkshadow117

Because professions in Spanish don't require un or una.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MHWilson

We are both wrong it is not son nor kid but daughter.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseJajarm

I hate this because it is a american spanish, mesera is not a word of a standar spanish, in spain(europe) we say camarero, this is better

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

It's better if you are in Spain to say, camarero, otherwise, not. There are an awful lot of other countries that speak Spanish beyond the borders of Spain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseJajarm

Well, I disagree with you, the students should learn a standard spanish....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

In my personal view, the students should learn what they most likely will be using, on trips to Mexico, or relocations to Central and South America.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christophsworld

Why is there no article?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnmelamed

Is "my daughter's a waitress" really wrong? Maybe it's an English grammar mistake on my part.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayDub1984

It pronounced it like it sounded like geesha? It should have been pronounced ee-ha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chakra23

So back to the original question, why isnt there an un here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ieroplane

Is she also an actress?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachopertrat

When can you use 'mesero' and when 'camarero'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TremikaGeo

I said "My daughter's a waitress." I don't get why they marked it wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally410

Ludwig3655, this thread is probably from some time ago but your discussion is interesting. As a teenager, I was a waitress in the school holidays. To be described as a waitress was fine. But even then, 'attracting the attention of the waitress' was a phase normally used via a third party. Where I live, the word is now 'mid flux', for want of a better term. We have some fifties style teashops. However, if you were to call "Waitress!", as in the fifties, it would not be well received. "Excuse me (Miss)" is acceptable, as it was in the fifties.
By the way, everyone, please never think of waiters as being somehow lesser beings. They work hard and can completely alter the quality of your dining experience for the better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally410

Addendum: Male Nurse is a term often heard in this area. But it is nothing offensive, it is just that both men and women can be startled if their nursing needs are not to be met by a female nurse. Why? Gender issues with regard to touch. It is therefore essentially a courtesy title,- based on numbers of m vs f nurses,- and no big deal. Back to the Spanish........

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/searsdee

South eastern Spain uses camrera/o quite alot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorDemps

Camarera is spanish for waitress. Mesera is not peninsular spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlorinBaban

Almost nobody uses the word "mesera" in Spain the most common word there is "camarera/o"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fionatastic

why did it mark me wrong when i said "waiter"? why does it have to be waitress when its a girl?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shailendra927631

Can we also use "Mi hija es camarera"? Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Breadlesssauron
Breadlesssauron
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What's the difference between "camarero" and "mesero" ? Is there any?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zweit
Zweit
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Isn't 'waiter' gender neutral in English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Agenou
Agenou
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I was born and raised in the US Midwest, and waitress was always the term for a female server. That word is still in use, especially among older people. While some people may use waiter for either gender, I don't think it's the preferred gender-neutral term; I mostly hear the word "server" to describe either male or female wait staff.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LianeBond

Apparently it is in US English it is... I'm from England and it would never occur to me to use waiter for a woman.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marisao4

Never heard of this term for waitress only a camarera

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

A standard rule in Spanish is that you don't use un/una for a profession: ella es doctora, él es maestro.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe161677

Dab everyone.

3 months ago