"Leur garçon est fort."

Translation:Their boy is strong.

April 1, 2013

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jenndizzle

I'm having trouble hearing any difference between 'le garcon' and 'leur garcon'?

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

You should hear an "R" sound at the end of "leur", while LE sounds like THE

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ericmagnuson

It is very hard to hear with this audio. In real conversation, it is easier.

June 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/frankspostings

Amen to that!

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/soleil_02

Me too!but it's bettet to think about sentences you have just heard. It works!

December 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sabrah786

In this sentence either one (le ou leur) makes sense so it's difficult to hear it properly in this audio.

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/desrain

me too!

January 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/alejolm1

I translated garçon as "kid" before and it was ok, but now its not accepted. Coherence missing. Excellent site, by the way.

December 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/torco

yeah, i had the same thing happen to me...

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/budzonex

why is garcon sometimes boys and sometime waiters

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BabsFrancais

Garçon is used for boy or kid, but it is unacceptable and disdainful to call a waiter "garçon"! This is like saying in English, "hey you","boy" or "honey" to a server!! In France it's why waiters sniff their Gallic noses, and won't wait on you! Try Monsieur or s'il vous plait!! Works much better!

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/michael.sandell

Really? Wow. My HS French teacher told us that's what they call their waiters...

March 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Your teacher is not wrong, it is just that the French don't use it any more.

March 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SnowyLake

That is speculated to have come from the early days when your 'waiter' was your servant or slave. In that case it was not considered rude to address them as such

October 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PanoramianView

This is where deduction comes in handy. If you're in the possessions section of DuoLingo, and you don't hear a possessive, then it's probably an error in hearing or in speaking. Either way, if you take the time to think about it, you can easily figure out that the word meant is "leur," rather than "le."

Unfortunately, I didn't take the time to think about it...

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Maybe a little late, but you did...

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dejashephe

when you hover the mouse over fort it gives loud as a meaning. but when i type their son is loud, it is not accepted >.<

August 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/nekoabyss

"Fort" translates to "loud" in a musical context, and then it still literally means "strong." This is because in order to play louder, you generally play an instrument with more strength.

January 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AabLevellen

Garçon=boy while fils=son. (Fils is pronounced fiss)

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
  • 327

ah. thanks!

November 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/serek123

happened to me as well :/

September 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/plantgrrl

Me too.

October 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/LolFail

me too

February 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/michael.sandell

Wait, so what's the difference between leur and sa/son?

March 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AabLevellen

Sa/son is the possessive of the third person singular. Leur is of the third person plural.

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KateRB82

"Fort" = "stout"? What?

January 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/torco

yup... works in spanish too: "fuerte" can mean stout, firm, tough as well as able to exert much force. being "fuerte" <and "fort" from the looks of it> includes taking a punch as well as throwing one.

January 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lashan.r

Leur is really difficult to pronounce ><

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

If it can help you, the sound of it is quite close to the second syllable of "pallor"

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

¡ "Leur fille": their girl/their daughter

¡ "Leur garçon": their boy/their son

February 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AabLevellen

No.

Leur fille: their girl/their daughter

Leur garçon: their boy

Leur fils: their son

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

C'est vrai? Pourquoi pas leur garçon comme "their son"? :o

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII

It could also mean "their son", even if leur fils is more frequently used.

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

Ah, d'accord. I think I remember seeing leur fils before, but I could not remember which is best to use. Merci! c:

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/beso.ZA

Leur use to the something plural we should say leur garçons ...not leur garçon ? Right ??!!

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

"leur" (= their) is used because the owners are plural.

but the object possessed can be singular: "leur garçon" (their boy) for 1 son and "leurs garçons" (their boys) for 2 or more sons.

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/K333222

are both pronounced exactly the same? how can we tell (without additional information) does speaker mean 1 or 2 boys, if we hear it in conversation, for example?

April 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Look at the verb:

  • leur garçon est fort
  • leurs garçons sont forts
April 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/K333222

of course, I'm aware of conjugation, but I had something different in mind-perhaps my question wasn't clear enough. I was thinking about hearing a short answer to some question in conversation- just hearing "Leur garcon.", and not knowing if it's 1 or more boys. Anyways, it seems that you have implicitly answered to this-"leur garcon" and "leurs garcons" are indeed both pronounced exactly the same and we do need to look for additional things to be sure. Thanks for your numerous commentaries on many different issues raised here on Duolingo; they make it much more efficient tool for learning French (at least for beginners such as myself).

April 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

Thanks Kristian.

I think you have learnt lesson nb1: French marks of plural -s (and -x) are mute.

Now, lesson nb2: they are pronounced as liaisons with a Z sound if the next word starts with a vowel or a non aspirate H:

  • leurs-Z-amis (their friends)
  • de beaux-Z-hommes (beautiful men)
April 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/154471

I apologise if this sounds facetious, but even in your example, you'd have context to know how many people you're speaking of, “who are they” wouldn't be answered “their son.”

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alijawad3

Easy

June 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/elisande

Plurals are killing me!

July 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII

You do realize there is nothing plural here, right? Unless you count the possessive that implies the people in relation to the boy are more than one.

July 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tamirsa

Duo taught that "fort" is strong or heavy, so I translated heavy but it was marked a mistake. Why?

April 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

With people "fort" means muscular and powerful.

"heavy" is only "lourd"

April 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CtWeed

what's wrong with the boy is "tough"?

March 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

tough = dur, difficile, robuste, résistant.

strong = fort

March 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dusics95

Can't garcon be translated as "son" ?

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf

garçon = boy

son = fils

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/682075

bad:(

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kittylover400

are you jealous!.......

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Twizzle20

once again, it could have been 'le' garcon and not 'leurs' - at least to my hearing

May 30, 2018
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