"Her banana is small."

Translation:उसका केला छोटा है।

October 2, 2018

21 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguini

This shouldn't be in the Animals lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeebo7

"वह" एक बंदरिया है


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leuix

Give her a bigger banana ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/financieen

What would be “his banana is small”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BooBooBadger

He doesn't like to talk about the size of his banana.


[deactivated user]

    The same. Uska is both her/his.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kristianwo9

    This is getting ridiculous fix the issue with practice sessions having invalid answers so you have to quit. Its ridiculous and makes the app look badly maintained!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angel_2008_

    So why is it chota and not choti?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/another-dave

    Because केला is masculine & the adjective agrees with the object's gender


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesNorth68358

    So there is no way of differentiating between her and his in this case?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjanaKuma461323

    Not unless if it's explicitly stated, I think it's more like singular "they".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varsha__s

    Why isn't it 'uski'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArnoNyhm2

    केला is masculine and therefore requires masculine forms: उसका, का, छोटा, काला etc.

    If you are irritated because "उसका has no gender": That refers to the gender of the possessor: his, her, its. The ending has to agree with the thing being possessed, but the word itself can refer to "he", "she" or "it" being the owner


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaryaaaaaa

    Why is it uska and not uski here? If uska is genderless, what's the point of uski?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArnoNyhm2

    "उसका has no gender": That refers to the gender of the possessor: his, her, (its). The ending has to agree with the thing being possessed, but the word itself can refer to "he" or "she" (technically also "it") being the owner. Example:

    • उसका बेटा ... his son or her son - उसका does not say here, if it is his or her son, but the ending -का agrees with the possessed entity: बेटा (m.)

    On the other hand:

    • उसकी बेटी ... his/her daughter. Again: उसकी does not say here, if it is his or her daughter, but the ending -की agrees with the possessed entity: बेटी (f.)

    This applies for other nouns too of course:

    उसका भाई his/her brother (brother m.)

    उलकी बहन his/her sister (sister f.)

    उसका कुत्ता his/her dog (dog m.)

    उसकी बिल्ली his/her cat (cat f.)

    And it also works with plural. It still means his/her and NOT their. The plural form indicates, that many things are owned, rather than that there are many owners:

    उसके भाई his/her brothers (brother m.)

    उलकी बहनें his/her sisters (sister f.)

    उसके कुत्ते - his/her dogs (dog m.)

    उसकी बिल्लियां - his/her cats (cat f.)

    If you wanted to say their, you would have to use उका, उकी and उके. Just like with उसका, the ending has to agree with the owned person/thing

    उसका बेटा (their son, m.)

    उसकी बेटी (their daughter, f.)

    उसके बेटे (their sons, m.)

    उसकी बेटियां (their daughters, f.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/big-oh

    Is their any reason why this can’t be “Their banana is small” which still implies genderless and singular


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demon_Sage

    What does the first Hindi word sound like and what does it mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerenei

    उसका = uska, it means his/her


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony700685

    Uska uski... Is both words can use here..?

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