https://www.duolingo.com/Louie.Fern

How long did it take to learn Esperanto?

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Hi,

Roughly how long did Esperanto take to learn? And how can I use it in real life/online?

5 months ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
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To the point that I felt comfortable with it? About 8 months, but I hadn't done much with the language. At 1 year I was able to meet another speaker in person for the first time and hold a conversation for 2 hours, so by that point I'd say I'd learned it for sure.

How you go about using it in real life and online depends on what you wish to accomplish with the language. Do you want to make friends? Find a local Esperanto group and/or join an online community like an Esperanto Discord or Telegram. Do you want to gain new perspectives on world events? Try reading Esperanto news articles and blogs from places like El Popola Ĉinio.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Holli67
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After some weeks on Duolingo I started reading a book in Esperanto ("Gerda malaperis!", of course, a famous book for beginners), and I could comfortably cruise along the first half of it. Some weeks later I finished it and understood it completely. I continued with other books and suddenly i noticed, that I was able to THINK in Esperanto! I had heard before, that it's easy to learn the language, but I never thought, that success will come so early. Of course, you need some dedication to it. if you don't like Esperanto and just want to learn it "on the go", you will have a hard time. I love the language, I love the great idea behind it and I love Zamenhof's beard, so these were the best conditions. :)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lectroidmarc

How long is entirely up to 1) your goals, 2) your effort and 3) your aptitude.

I would say I could "bumble through and embarrass myself" in reading/writing/listening/speaking at maybe three months. But according to Duo I've been at it now for 263 days and I can read/write it maybe fairly well (as long as a dictionary is close) and I like to think I'm getting better at listening but I still suck at speaking it. But that's ok, because I know that's fair given my effort level (not super high) and goals, which never originally included being particularly fluent.

You asked anpother questions tho: How can I use it in real life/online

Well, online there are a number of Eperanto web publications and chat/social type things. In fact I find myself doing a lot of reading and writing online (which explains my better proficiency there). Check out https://telegramo.org and/or https://amikumu.com. In real life there's probably an Esperanto group in a city near you and there's always Pasporta Servo (https://www.pasportaservo.org) if you like to travel.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duanxiu
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I started in 2005 and after two months I was speaking (although with many errors) with other esperantists. I already knew most of the words through french. My favourite way to meet a (new) esperanto speaker is Amikumu app but find out if there is any esperanto club near you. Kaj skribu tie cxi en esperanto.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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I have some videos about this.

Perhaps my reply in this thread would be of interest. This one too.


Come to think of it - I learned Esperanto in one month.

I never word it that way, but I mention it a lot. Back in the day there was no Duolingo and if you wanted to have an interactive experience learning Esperanto you actually had to interact with people - at least through email. It was on a lunch break. I settled in by the pond with a printout of an email (imagine that!) and puzzled through it... and thought about what I could say in reply. I was suddenly struck with the thought - one month into my learning - that even if I stopped learning Esperanto, that Esperanto would always be mine. That is, I'd always be able to puzzle through emails like that as long as I had my dictionary.

I think it was a watershed moment in my learning of Esperanto.


https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/28779023/Were-you-able-to-be-fluent-in-Esperanto-in-less-than-200-hours

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLl5PRFz0DHxYxGYD1RmVooEudFcQDN6gl

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RhettButtlord
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do you remember what the email was about

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Yes. It was about two paragraphs long.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoKin9

Badum TSS.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RhettButtlord
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this joke salivanto i will give two lingots

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RhettButtlord
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i have them to the wrong gentleman by mistake, i will now add more

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lectroidmarc

My first "OMG I can read this!" was similar. An email from a local Esperanto group announcing a meeting. I was pretty thrilled when I realized I could read the whole thing and only then discovered the English translation -- that I didn't need.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Louie.Fern
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Thanks for the help!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BafouillCharabia
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I have heard something about 150 hours (compare to 2000 hours for German). Of course, that depends a lot about your ability ro remember new words.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnikaQED
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I can't say I have "learned Esperanto", in the sense of speaking it at all well (almost no practice in doing that) but I DID finish "gilding the tree" as of October 18. Here are some statistics I kept on that whole experience, if that is at all helpful.

I started October 31, 2017, so it took me 353 days. When I started, it was before Levels.

10/31/17 - 11/16/17 Completed the tree. (57 hrs)

11/17/17 - 4/8/18 Kept "holes" filled. (62 hrs)

(4/9/18) "Levels" instituted.

4/9/18 - 4/28/18 Brought entire “old” tree up to Level 2 (26 hrs)

4/29/18 - 5/16/18 Brought entire “old” tree up to Level 3 (19 hrs)

(5/17/18) 18 new skills added to the Esperanto tree

5/18/18 - 6/11/18 Brought all the new skills up to Level 2 (45 hrs)

6/12/18 - 10/18/18 Brought rest of tree up to Level 3 (99 hrs) Brought tree up to Level 4 (33 hrs) Brought tree up to Level 5 (43 hrs)

So the Total time spent was 384 hrs

Reaching Levels 4 and 5 was streamlined by testing out; of the 43896 XP I earned in Esperanto, I got 25670 XP from "Testing out".

(Finally , thanks to the Duolingo staff for making this all possible, and to the fellow Esperantists on the discussion board - especially Salivanto! - for your helpful comments. Gratulon!)

I did find that after a couple of months I could read simple Esperanto with the help of a dictionary. I think I was helped, though, by having had 4 yrs of high-school French, 2 yrs of high-school Latin, 1 yr of high-school German, and 3 yrs of college Russian. So it was very easy finding cognates, especially with French. My college minor in Russian probably took around 2000 hrs of effort and even at my best, it would take me 15 - 30 min to translate a page of Russian. Now I can read a page of Esperanto in under 5 minutes. So for 1/5 the time investment as Russian, I can read Esperanto around 5 times as well as Russian.

Hope this is encouraging!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carbsrule
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I'm still learning :)

But certainly I could understand a lot after finishing the Duolingo course. I'd done some study on the old version of Lernu before, and read some of an old "teach yourself" book from the 1950s that I found in the uni library.

In real life there's probably a local group nearby - my local group meets monthly, and someone gives a presentation on a topic of their choosing. And there are lots of international events: http://www.eventoj.hu/2018.htm

Online there are forums at Lernu, there's Stack Exchange, there's an Esperanto subreddit, there's Telegram, Facebook groups, etc.

Good luck :)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikhil3
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I started to learn Esperanto in 2007-2008 through Lernu and FEC on Pacujo. It was just an arbitrary effort ii.e on an off.

Within few weeks I was able to read small articles on Wikipedia. And in around 4 to 5 months, I was able to go through Gerda Malaperis once.

It was a time when I was formally learning French too. And I was also learning German, Spanish and Italian from free online resources.

Then for a long period I didn't use Esperanto actively. When Duolingo course was created - I gave it a shot once or twice. But, I had no motivation to complete the tree then.

Now back into the Esperantujo for the past 4 months. I had my first oral discussion in Esperanto almost 4 months ago. I have been to 3 local Esperanto meetups. I completed my 1st Crown level tree in 4 to 5 days through testing out. And second in another week or so of time..

I can say I have somewhere around A2+ level in speaking skills and I can read materials of a difficulty level of around B2 (upper intermediate).

I haven't written much in Esperanto. I created the initial draft published for 2 wikis on Wikipedia - which were then edited by other "spertuloj" ( experts )

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Cxu vi memoras kiu estis via instruisto en FEC?

Jen filmetserio kiun mia filo kaj mi faris por klarigi tiun kurson.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLl5PRFz0DHxZFcwSHcLDDkVzVq553ULx3

3 months ago
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