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"Él lo va a superar."

Translation:He is going to overcome it.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/robotochalk

Seems like "He is going to get over it" should work too...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/g_asaki

I answered the very same thing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hayley697686

Me too

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwezomePozzum

I'm pretty sure that "get over" would be said differently in spanish...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evigmae
evigmae
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it really should... it's a matter of context i guess. but we have no context here, so both answers should be fine.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bradkrupsaw

I agree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Did anyone report this? I answered the same today (July 23, 2015) and Duo still won't accept it. I reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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It worked elsewhere....with a slightly different sentence...but still....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bmr209
bmr209
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You normally say "get over it" when talking about an illness or a break up. I wouldn't use superar for an illness which I think goes better with recuperarse. For a break up, superar might work but I think sobreponerse would work better. I think superar works better when it means overcome, surpass or conquer instead of get over.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmaJennie

How about 'supersede'?

Sorry, guess not. 'Supersede' means "to displace".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithMP
MeredithMPPlus
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I said "he will get past it" which I think should also work, but apparently not.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElzoFilho
ElzoFilho
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I also think that "He is going to get over it shoud" work

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dakota_Marz

"get over it" does not have the same meaning. In english, "get over it" is more or less used in a sarcastic connotation. Therefore, "get over it" would be used in a situation like this: "He just lost his girlfriend" "Oh, he will get over it". So, basically surpass has a positive aspect to it, while "get over it" is a phrase with a negative aspect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnimble
Gnimble
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I did not hear the "a" when the computer pronounce the sentence. But because it is future tense, I know it needs to be there. Does anyone else have problems hearing it too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/encody

You're an overcomer... Stay in the fight 'til the final round, You're not going under...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

"He is going to exceed it" was marked as incorrect, despite the fact that exceed was one of the definitions given in the drop down menu for the word Superar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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remember that "all" drop downs" do not always apply. That being said, in this case i think that you are correct. i would report it as a possible answer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Syran
Syran
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It is accepted now :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kdpeter1

Va sounded like pa, which makes no sense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukasvanS

It's going to overcome him' isn't correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyBlake1

In a sentence like this, the first pronoun is the person or thing doing the action. The second pronoun indicates who the action is being done to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israelmark11

ughhhh. WHyyyyy

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FranLeaven

What is the difference, " He is going to overcome " or He is going to overcome it"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

The "lo" is the "it," the direct object, and requires translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonwk

She mumbles this one. Without the slowed speech option this sounds like Él No va a superar

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoldenGuse

Is "He is going to achieve it" similar?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Not particularly. "Achieve" (lograr) is reaching a goal, while "overcome" (superar) is about surpassing an obstacle.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidTourn1

Thanks for the comments

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

The correct answer on my page was "He is going to overcome HIM" not "it" I was wrong for a different reason, but I'm now a little confused. Can "lo" be "it" as well as "him" or "her"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Lo" as a direct object pronoun can mean "him," "it," or "you."
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/lo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron152366

He will master it

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

C'mon Duolingo! 'He is going to get over it' is a correct translation! I'm so sick of all these small errors, and reporting them appears to be futile.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laraliz1990

doesnt work for he is going to win

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marquezy

Could it also be He is going to overcome him? Or is there a different verb when overcoming a person?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mdawg_2001

i feel "he will overcome" should do..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quicklearner90

Would "he is going to ace it" be correct as well?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mdawg_2001

i feel "he will overcome" should do..

2 years ago