https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Pozin2

The very famous Russian proverb.

"Бабка надвое сказала." It means we do not know the result - it will be or not. "Бабка" - is a very old woman (do not miss with grandmother). It may be rather a witch. "Надвое" is used when someone talks about a dual situation: it will be or not. An example: "Я сильнее тебя!" " Ну, это бабка надвое сказала. Это я сильнее тебя!" Or - "I think that the harvest will be good." "Ну, это бабка надвое сказала. Он может быть плохой". This saying is used a lot in literature, movies, spoken languages, even in speeches of famous persons. I am sure, English has something that is close to that proverb.

October 4, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariuszFil2

There is the exact same expression in Polish: 'Na dwoje babka wróżyła'

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanna-Louise

that is very interesting, thanks for mentioning this!

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AUZAZURZ

How about to collect funny russian bywords in this topic? For example, I can remember another one about "babka" - "одна бабка сказала". That means: "I've heard some gossip from a very "reliable" source of information, which is not, however, an evident fake".

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wcjerky

The closest expression used in my area to that Russian expression in English is 'que sera, sera,' which is French for 'what will be, will be,' literally translated. Its prominent use can be traced to a song from Alfred Hitchcock's 'A Man Who Knew Too Much' where Doris Day sings the aforementioned proverb. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doris_Day)

Yes, English is a strange language.

October 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.Gregor

"Que sera, sera" is Spanish.

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisokoFukumoto

I don't know, but it sounds french. Que - what | sera - will/is going to be

I'm most likely am wrong, though

October 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.Gregor

The words exist in French (although it's será in Spanish and sera in French), but the sentence wouldn't be grammatically correct in French. The saying is most definitely Spanish.

October 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

I would say, the closest to collocation in English is double meaning. The "wise grannies" express themselves with doubt and ambiguity, so what they say can be interpreted both directly and reversely.

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artiom447504

Sounds very archaic though

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanna-Louise

yes..this expression ,it is not really that modern..mostly it is from literature or from the old days..

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Pozin2

Archaic? Recently it was used by Putin.

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
Mod
  • 1572

The stalwart of modernity...

October 6, 2018
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.