"Ua ʻo Hilo."

Translation:Hilo rains.

October 6, 2018

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/miacomet
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It seems unnatural to say "Hilo rains" rather than "It's raining in Hilo". I get that in this sentence, Hilo serves as the subject of the sentence, but wouldn't the latter be more idiomatic in English? (I can't report the English part of the sentence as incorrect. Not sure why)

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sheldon.abril

in Hawaiian, "ua ʻo Hilo" is a general statement: Hilo rains. to say it's raining in Hilo would give it a sense of time, and in Hawaiian, there's different ways to say things about past/present/future. it is raining in Hilo would be a present tense sentence, which means you'd use a ke/nei sentence pattern: "ke ua nei i Hilo" -- it's raining in Hilo

October 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kananileialoha

Thank you - I agree, and I think the fact that it is a general statement in Hawaiian is what might be what is confusing in translation. As (nvi.) "ua" can mean rain; to rain; rainy. As miacomet mentioned, In this case the 'o in the statement is marking Hilo (a place) as the subject of the sentence. Because there is an 'okina before the o, it is not "Ua o Hilo" which would be translated as "The rain/rains of(belonging to) Hilo," or I suppose quite literally "Hilo's rain(s)." Additionally, something else that can be confusing with this sentence is the English word RAIN. The word is already a pluralizer for multiple rain drops falling together, but RAINS (as a noun) implies that there is more than one rainfall, and RAINS (as a verb) is 3rd person present. Therefore, I apologize for the long commentary to simply say yes, I agree with sheldonabril's statement regarding: Hilo rains. It's just so exciting to me to discuss the nuances of it!

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jessi784299
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So interesting ! So could "Ua ʻo Hilo," be translated as something like... "It's rainy in Hilo," or "Hilo is rainy," to give a more "in general" sense?

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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Hilo is rainy sounds closer to what a native English speaker would say. Hilo rains sounds like a verse of poetry or song.

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
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Beginner here, and I apologize for this slightly off-topic question, but in reference to your (sheldon.abril) "ke ua nei i Hilo," would you explain ke and nei in your sentence? I would think ua would take ka, but it seems to be interacting with nei in some way. Mahalo.

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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Ke ua nei is different from the ke/ka meaning the. The rain is indeed ka ua but that is a noun - the rain. Ke ua nei has ua as a verb - It is raining. Ke ... nei are verb markers for present progressive tense.

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/drigoro2000
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what is Hilo

October 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/miacomet
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Hilo is a city in Hawai'i.

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchTalmadge

Even when you're not sure, since Hilo is preceded by ʻo, which can be thought of as a "name announcer", you can guess that the word is the name of a person or place.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan330940

To put in my two-penny worth, "Hilo rains" actually sounds as if it is (some) hilo that is falling from the sky like rain, rather than water falling from the sky on someone/someplace/something called Hilo. That may be my dialect (modified East London in UK) speaking, mind.

"Hilo is rainy" sounds to me like a general time-free statement about Hilo's climate, not what it is like there now - and it is the latter which I assume is what is intended.

I would always say "It's raining in Hilo."

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Esperanza131667

I was born and raised in Hawaii. We never said "Honolulu rains" or "Hilo rains". In pidgen we'd say "Hilo raining" :)

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JHaalilioH

Hilo is rainy wasn't correct either yet Polalauahi ‘o Puna correctly indicated is "Puna is voggy"

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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It should be accepted now.

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JHaalilioH

Okay, thank you.

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnomi
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I'm a bit confused about the use of 'o. For example, why would you use it in Ua 'o Hilo and not in maika'i au.

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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Because Hilo is a proper name being used as the subject of the verb. Au as a pronoun does not need 'o.

December 20, 2018
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