1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Non si sentiranno bene."

"Non si sentiranno bene."

Translation:They will not feel well.

May 8, 2014

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pierugofoz

(I'm italian)
1) They are not going to feel well
2) They will not feel well
what is the difference between the two sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valm86

I am a native english speaker and to me both sentences mean the same thing. I also asked this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

Agree. I think they mean the same. And DL accepts them both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolarBear667564

Good question. Use of 'will' implies a fact, whereas 'going to' implies consequences, e.g. 'if they eat all those sweets, they are not going to feel well'. A word of warning, DL is crap at making the distinction, hence why native English speakers have problems with it here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily_blue

why is 'si' used here, why can't it be: Non sentiranno bene. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandrabruck

sentirsi and sentire have different meanings.

sentire:

1) to hear

  • Lo senti? = Can you hear it?

  • Stammi a sentire (listen to me!)

2) to feel (with physical feelings)

  • sento freddo (I am cold)

  • sento un dolore alla gamba

3) to smell

  • sento un odore di gas (I smell gas)

4) followed by a noun it has the same meaning as provare:

  • sentire paura/ provare paura (to feel afraid)

5) sentire qualcuno

  • to hear from somebody

6) expresses that you have an impression (sense)

  • sento che sta per succedere qualcosa

sentirsi is only to feel

I would understand: Non sentiranno bene as They are not going to hear well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcpjenn

Sandra, That's a great explaination, but it doesn't answer Lily_Blue's or my question: why is the word "si" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rcpjenn

Or does it indicate that they are going to feel, rather than hear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandrabruck

yes, because it's the reflexive verb "sentirsi" mi sento, ti senti, si sente ecc. instead of the normal verb "sentire" sento, senti, sente ecc.

sentirsi = to feel sentire = to hear, to smell....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaDiana945924

Sorry,but how I have to translate this sentence: "they will not hear themselves well"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The___Idler

In response to DianaDiana's question.

Maybe it's "non si sentiranno benne" or "non sentiranno bene se stessi", with the latter being less equivocal.

Dear Italians, please join the discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/firefirefirefire

I think "si" is to indicate that they are not feeling well themselves, as opposed to feeling a separate object or emotion. It indicates that they are the object of the verb as well as the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valm86

Could you translate this as "they will not feel well"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendanParmer

Signore Stark, non mi sento così bene...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roamertje

Haha, noooooo...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maya376523

Shouldn't "They will not feel fine" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frankie7012

"They are not going to hear well" is wrong? if so, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard754173

All will be known by studying the previous comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosianeRig1

Why cant i say they will not feel well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard754173

All will be known by studying the previous comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosianeRig1

They will not feel better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard754173

That would be 'meglio' instead of 'bene'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Hanno bevuto troppo?

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
Get started