"Jesus be with you."

Translation:Iesū pū.

10/8/2018, 2:42:08 AM

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KamiraAkari
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God be with you, now Jesus be with you..hmm why is this necessary in learning Hawaiian lol

10/8/2018, 2:42:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ElMeuNom
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They are much more common in Hawaiian than in English. Hawaiians have a long religious tradition because of Christian missionaries that went to the islands. In fact, I believe those missionaries are the ones that invented the Hawaiian alphabet. Learning these phrases will help you understand people, even if you choose never to use them yourself.

10/10/2018, 3:28:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kale333901

There are a LOT more expressions in Hawaiian that are representative of the place of Hawaii than what is being presented here...what do you mean by "They are much more common in Hawaiian than in English"? It is because of English and missionizing that we have these expressions in Hawaiian in the first place, like Good-Bye is a contracted form rooted in "God-be-wth-you" thats commonly said as a farewell in English ALL THE TIME...So we can actually learn a lot about people when we actually speak with their Beliefs, Philosophy, and Perspective, not with someone elses who colonized them for their own self-interests... As for the alphabet, that was not necessary for the people to develop the advance and sophisticated culture they already had, the alphabet was made so they could create christian bibles in the Hawaiian language to better indoctrinate people to a foreign belief that displaced them from their belonging to a place and being at home. Think more deeply and with compassion, MAHALO iā`oe, ALOHA pū

10/10/2018, 9:12:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronD.2
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This course is in a very early beta state, and so far only has a handful of contributors.

It isn't a comprehensive course on the Hawaiian language, and not even the most extensive courses on Duolingo are designed to get you to fluency.

Perhaps you should contribute to the course if you would like it to be more robust.

10/14/2018, 8:34:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kale333901

Aloha my Friend! Yes totally understand what you're explaining and I know that Duolingo is more of an aid/supplement/app to engage with language learning.

In those regards, the Duolingo app is used by millions of people, therefore they have a great responsibility to fully represent any language they offer for people to learn, so I am speaking on the diversity/inclusivity of the Hawaiian language and I am noticing many people ask if these christian based phrases are common, where I wholeheartedly give an honest reply to say NO, while explaining as to why.

In that I feel like I am contributing to the experience of the Hawaiian language portion of Duolingo, Me ke ALOHA, MALAMA PONO

10/15/2018, 7:32:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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Kāko‘o iā 'oe, e Kale. I took years of Hawaiian and spent 21 years in Hawai'i, and I never heard these expressions until a few years ago on Facebook. They seem to be very recent and very hapa haole like Hau'oli lā hānau is. What I see are grammar rules broken left and right, with quite a bit of glossing of semantics in these expressions. I would love to see examples of use in historical documents if they exist. Mahalo.

11/1/2018, 7:32:42 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
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Because Hawaiians use this phrase?

10/13/2018, 5:11:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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And why does this not start with 'O at the very least?

11/1/2018, 7:25:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel724482

Documents. Tell me what you think. I believe i have a copy of the original letter from the queen to the president, and a letter about going to get some ice cream back in the 1800s. Lots of stuff, not just newspapers.

2/21/2019, 5:46:29 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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I am not looking through every single piece. The ONE that you mentioned with specifics that is in Hawaiian about the ice cream party does not use any of these expressions, and the second one is not under Lili'uokalani's list of TWO letters. The second one in that list is in English. Strange how you say there are plenty of examples, but the ones you give 1) do not have these expressions or 2) cannot be found.

2/22/2019, 2:44:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Charissa447724

Why does it keep saying i have a typo when I put Lesū pū? Is there some rule about the word not being capitalized?

3/3/2019, 6:35:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jdmcowan
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It should be a capital i, not an L. It will also accept a lower case i, I'm sure, but it won't accept any kind of L. And it's pronounced ee-eh-soo. If you look carefully, you can distinguish the l (lower case L) from the I (uppercase i) because the l has a small curl at the bottom and the I doesn't.

3/3/2019, 6:41:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Charissa447724

Mahalo! That makes a lot more sense

3/6/2019, 7:46:42 PM
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