"No Hawaiʻi au."

Translation:I am from Hawaiʻi.

October 9, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kananileialoha

The directional "mai" (also a Prep. meaning from) is missing from this sentence. Generally you would ask, "No hea mai 'oe?" (Where are you from?) And answer, "No Honolulu mai au (I am from Honolulu).

October 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SpeakOnIt
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Thanks for the info. I hope you reported it on the exercise.

October 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/debordmatthew
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In English (American, at least, as far as I know) the apostrophe is more or less optional. In Hawaiian, of course the ʻokina is used, but I don't always see everyone using it (or an apostrophe) in the state's name.

October 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kelii....
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The 'okina and kahakō were not originally used way back when as the language was first put to paper, except where clarity was required, ko'u (my) vs. kou (your) for example. Advanced speakers tend to revert back to leaving them out, as they are often seen simply as aids for beginners. Some also may not have them on their devices keyboard to be able to use them.

November 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/emperorchiao
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In Hawai‘i we always pronounce the name of the state and the island with the ‘okina, and use it in writing as far as possible. General American English on the mainland does not.

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rabelon

Sometimes they want common usage, such as "where are you from" as opposed to "From where are you." Other times they prefer awkward construction rather than teaching common usage. They want it both ways, to the detriment of the new learner.

November 13, 2018
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