"Meine Tochter ist bei ihren Großeltern."

Translation:My daughter is with her grandparents.

April 1, 2013

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmorgan6

Could this sentence also be: "Meine Tochter ist MIT ihren GroBeltern"? "mit" instead of "bei"? Is there a reason that "bei" is being used instead?

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Yes, „Meine Tochter ist bei ihren Großeltern.“ means “My daughter is [located] at her grandparents['s place]”. But ‘mit’ is used instead of ‘bei’ if she's traveling with her grandparents, as in „Meine Tochter ist mit ihren Großeltern unterwegs.“ = “My daughter is en route with her grandparents.”; or if she's together with her grandparents somewhere other than their place, as in „Meine Tochter ist mit ihren Großeltern im Kino.“ = “My daughter is in the cinema with her grandparents.”.

June 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

No, "mit ihren Großeltern" is wrong. You need to use "bei".

http://www.duolingo.com/#/comment/413531

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSel

"my daughter is with her grandparents" and my daughter eats with her grandparents" would sound the same?

April 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Yes.

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElibeyElili

mit und bei are the same

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K.Alix

No. "My daughter eats with her grandparents" is "Meine Tochter ISST mit ihren Großeltern" Isst and ist are two different verbs.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The pronunciation is identical, though.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avernie

i have a question. the difference wouldn't be the "mit" in "Meine Tochter isst --mit-- ihren Großeltern." or you could say "Meine Tochter isst --bei-- ihren Großeltern." and mean the same? are both well said?

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Both are proper, but they have different meanings: ‘bei’ means “at their place” (like the French ‘chez’); ‘mit’ means “together with them [somewhere else]”.

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avernie

that's what i was wondering. thanks :)

December 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theabigaillo

According to christian, "mit" is wrong in this case: http://www.duolingo.com/comment/413531

December 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

This doesn't apply here since you have a different verb. In our case (with "essen"), both "mit" and "bei" are possible – Andreas Witnstein mentioned the different meanings. With the verb "sein" it can only be "bei".

December 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theabigaillo

@wataya: Sorry, I read avernie's post wrong!

December 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d2coutinho

Sorry Christian, but on this occasion you are wrong. Many native German friends have confirmed that there is indeed a subtle difference, related to short and long sounds, ist and isst should sound slightly different (for an advanced German student or native speaker). Renato (above) was perfectly right in his comment, unfortunately you told him otherwise.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

This is incorrect. In standard German they are exact homophones. No difference whatsoever.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Your friends are wrong.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@d2coutinho: No need to be sarcastic. They are wrong. The point is this: Standard German only distinguishes between long and short vowels. Anything in between doesn't carry any meaning by definition. So there can't be "subtle differences in the length of vowels" to distinguish between "ist" and "isst". If there were and they were used to distinguish between "ist" and "isst", that would mean that you have found an additional German phoneme (that's exactly the definition of a phoneme) that a) is used by millions of German speakers throughout German speaking countries (otherwise, it can't be part of standard German) and b) hasn't been noticed by professional linguists yet (otherwise, they would distinguish at least three classes of vowel lengths) and this with words as common as "ist" and "isst". You can judge by yourself how likely such a scenario is. And even if this all were the case, it would still have to be recognized by a standardization body to be part of the standard language and incorporated into the "official" phoneme inventar of German. So, yes: You can tell your friends they're wrong.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d2coutinho

@wataya : Wow. I wasn't being sarcastic. It's tricky to be sure without listening to my tone of voice, I agree. But hey, that sounded aggressive from you..no need. (of course I will never be sure if you meant to, there's no standardization body for tone of voice/written words :P )

I'm genuinely pleased to be learning that much about German with you guys, including IST and ISST :)

Merry Christmas anyhow! :)

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d2coutinho

ok thanks Christian. I'll go tell my friends that they are wrong.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@d2coutinho. OK! No worries.

December 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K.Alix

No, the 's' on 'isst' is stressed more.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Trust me, it's not. I'm a native speaker of German.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

In careful speech, they are pronounced exactly the same. In colloquial (rapid) speech, however, people may drop the /t/ in "ist". The quality of the /s/ does not change, though.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Just chiming in to confirm what christian said. In standard German 'ist' and 'isst' are exact homophones. In some regiolects the 't' may be omitted in rapid speech as christian already pointed out. But this is not standard German and therefore not really relevant for duolingo.

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

@KendallHolm: That's a feature of the Ruhr regiolect. It's also common to merge verbs and personal pronouns. "Verben + nachgestellte Personalpronomina verschmelzen regelmäßig. An der Verbindungsstelle kommt es zu zusätzlichen lautlichen Anpassungen. Hier die Serie mit kommen im Präsens: kommich, kommße, kommter, kommtse, kommdet/kommtet, kommwer, kommder/kommter, kommse/kommense." http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruhrdeutsch

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karl-A

I made some people say, "sie ist bei ihm" und "sie isst bei ihm" and in the first version the "t" is omitted. Not so in the "eat" version. - Edit, because your comment must have slipped in while I was writing mine - The funny thing is, when you make people pronounce the t in "ist" they tend to stress the s in "isst". At least here around me in Berlin. :-) "Sie ist bei ihm denn sie isst gerne bei ihm".

May 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KendallHolm

Dont you do that with a lot of verbs. I was talking to this one german femal and she kept dropping all of the verb endings. Like when she said Sie machen she said Sie mach or she would say Sie brauch instead of Sie brauchen

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@Kendall: Are you sure she didn't just have hiccups? "Sie mach" and "Sie brauch" are definitely way off ;-)

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KendallHolm

@wataya Maybe ... it sounded natural to me. She would also do it to the endings of dies, kein, ein and any other word that has endings that change. She is from Essen and she is supposed to help me with my colliqual speech and she def has issues with endings or she is intentionally leaving the endings out.

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarunDangwal

I accidentally put 'my daughter is with "your" grand parents' and it got accepted? Should it be wrong, I am confused? Dative: Your -> Ihrer?

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

It should be wrong, I think. "Meine Tochter ist bei Ihren Großeltern." that's how the sentence would look like. The "Sie", "Ihren", "Ihnen" is always capitalized if it is meant to be a (formal) you.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyIP2

My daughter is in her grandparents´place should be correct answer as well.

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ignac

Since one of the proposed translations of "bei" is "near", could the present sentence be translated as "My daughter is near her grandparents"?

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Technically yes, but it wouldn't be interpreted that way. If you wanted to say "near her parents", you'd say something along the lines of "in der Nähe ihrer Großeltern".

April 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melarish

Actually, the multiple choice wanted me to pick "near" as well.

September 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonas.Molinder

It says that another correct solution is "My daughter is with her grandparents." but shouldn't her in dativ be "ihrer"?

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The dative plural is "ihren".

http://goo.gl/Om5YS

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pozory.myla

i absolutely can't understand why it is here "ihren" instead of "ihnen"?? "Grosseltern" are plural..help:(

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

‘bei ihnen’ = “by them”

‘bei ihren Großeltern’ = “by {her|their} grandparents

‘bei ihrem Großelternteil’ = “by {her|their} grandparent”

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedSafwa8

Is that applies too to "with her grandmother" ?

October 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankKlus

Doesnt "bei" also mean "at"? I translated the sentence as "at her grandparents" and it was marked wrong.

June 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f0xG3_PatG

Does this sentence imply that the daughter is living with her grandparents as opposed to her with them at the moment ? At least that's how I understood the difference of bei and mit.

July 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

No. You simply don't use "mit" with persons in these contexts in German.

"Meine Tochter ist bei ihren Großeltern." doesn't state whether she's there right now or permanently. If you want to say that she is living with her grandparents, you'd say "Meine Tochter lebt bei ihren Großeltern." or "Meine Tochter wohnt bei ihren Großeltern."

The difference of "mit" and "bei" is that "mit" is always used if two or more people are doing the same together. So you can "mit jemandem Eis essen gehen" (Going out for ice cream with someone), "mit jemandem ins Kino gehen" (going to the movies with someone), "mit jemanden kochen" (cooking with someone) ect., but if someone is (only) in the care (for children) of another or as a location information - near someone else., you use "bei".

"Meine Tochter ist bei ihren Großeltern." doesn't say anything about what they're doing, whether they're doing something together. It is meant to say that you don't have to worry because the grandparents make sure that nothing happens to her (or that she doesn't harm anything/anyone else) OR that she is at her grandparents' house or with her grandparents somewhere else. (So you know where to pick her up or that you can call her by calling her grandparents' (cell) phone number.)

July 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f0xG3_PatG

Thanks for the elaborate reply. This kinda helped me clear up some confusion on the two words :.

July 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b.lostgirl

Why is not ok if i wrote meine tochter ist bei ihren grosseltern?

July 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

The first letter of a sentence is capitalized: ‘Meine’, not ‘meine’.

The first letter of a noun is capitalzied: ‘Tochter’, not ‘tochter’; ‘Großeltern’, not ‘großeltern’.

The vowel in ‘Groß’ is tense (long), so it's written with ‘ß’, not ‘ss’.

July 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S_Bharati

I could not understood the pronounciation " bei ihren"

August 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyeldiin

Why not "bei ihrem Großeltern"? as Großeltern is Neuter and its article in the Dat. case is Dem.

March 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

The ‘-n’ suffix in ‘Großeltern’ is not, as it might appear to be, a masculine singular dative suffix. ‘Großeltern’=“grandparents” is a masculine plural noun, and has no singular form. The singular is ‘Großelternteil’=“grandparent”.

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynChannell

I thought ihr was = her and ihren was = their. Does anyone have a simple explanation for me? Thanks

April 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

The possessive adjective ‘ihr’ can mean “her”, “their”, or (if capitalized ‘Ihr’) “your [formal]”; only the context can tell the difference.

The ending ‘-en’ in this sentence is the dative plural: dative because the preposition ‘bei’ always takes the dative case; plural because ‘Großeltern’ is plural.

German adjective declension is complicated. The declension of the possessive adjective ‘ihr’ is:

m.s.      f.s.     n.s.       plural

ihr        ihre    ihr        ihre  nominative

ihres    ihrer  ihres    ihrer  genitive

ihrem  ihrer  ihrem  ihren  dative

ihren   ihre    ihr        ihre   accusative

April 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynChannell

Thank you very much. Your explanation is very thorough and helpful. I obviously need to learn more grammar with my list of words (:

April 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kookkie

My daughter is at her grandparents'.

May 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Also a good translation.

May 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeoHaines

Really the question should be 'Meine Tochter bei meinen Eltern.', because it is saying that the daughter is with the parents parents, not 'Meine Tochter ist mit ihren Großeltern.', my daughter is with her grandparents. Even though it still all makes sense.

August 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianluca989

How do you distinguish between "my daughter is with her grandparents" and "my daughter is with your grandparents"

September 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

In writing, “your [formal]” would be capitalized as ‘Ihren’, whereas “their” wouldn't be. In spoken German, they would only be distinguishable from the context.

September 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianluca989

OK that sounds right but how come you used "their".... I'm looking at "her grandparents" and "your grandparents"

September 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Sorry, I misread your question. In German, the possessive adjectives ‘ihr’=“her” and ‘ihr’=“their” are identically pronounced and spelled in all declensions. The possessive adjective ‘Ihr’=“your [formal]”, which was historically the “royal they” is also identically pronounced and spelled in all declensions, except that it's capitalized.

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianluca989

So I suppose it's only distinguishable by context then. Thanks for the help

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlazingFast

Why is bei ihren used?

When is "ihrer" used?

December 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

See christian's reply to Jonas.Molinder.

December 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlazingFast

Ohhh, I see now. Thanks. That chart was something I missed.

December 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SebastienL50561

Everyone's arguing about ist/isst and I just want to know how to differentiate ihr as her and ihr as your in this context. I entered eating with your grandfather and got it correct, so I was wondering if there was any way you could tell. Thanks.

July 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Only from the context; ‘ihr’ is pronounced identically whether it means ‘her’, ‘your’, or ‘you’.

July 7, 2015
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