"Do not come here."

Translation:Non venire qui.

April 1, 2013

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gregers212

Why is this in infinitive form, and not: Non vieni qui? I do not understand the differerence.

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2086

The infinitive is used to cover the second person singular of the negative imperative; "non vieni qui" means you're not coming here (simple present).

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/azurj

Hmm.. Is there a second person alternative besides imperative? The imperative is not only for second person singular, it's just for any person and any number, isn't it?

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2086

Not for any person and number, as you can't order yourself, so the first person is always missing; in Italian it's fused with the exhortative (taken from subjunctive) so it has an almost complete conjugation. I'm not sure what alternative you're looking for, the English "do not come here" is certainly imperative, so it's either "non venire qui" or "non venga qui" (formal you).

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/azurj

"non venga qui" is interesting. How do you say it in plural? ... Thank you

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2086

That's right, the English could be plural too. The plural of the formal you is Loro, so it would be "non vengano qui", but while Lei became so popular that it even took the polite voi's place, Loro is felt as very polite and formal, so people often switch to the normal voi when addressing more than one person (non venite qui).

September 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/IARose
  • 1283

The negative imperative for tu (second person singular) in all conjugations is formed by placing non before the infinitive. The noi (though rarely used) and voi forms are identical to those in the affirmative.

July 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

Differences between qua and qui?

February 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sardinecan

From what I have read, Qui means: precisely right here. While Qua means: here in this general area. The same seems to go with the Italian words for "There". Lì means: precisely right there. While Là means: there in that general area. Hope this helps!

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

Deve ser como «cá» e «aqui».

April 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CinziaL52

Why is "He does not come here" acceptable? How would you say that in Italian if "Non venire qui" means "Don't come here?"

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

Since "does not come" is in the present tense, you would conjugate the infinitive «venire» to the present «lui (non) viene», just like in English you would conjugate the infinitive "to come" to the present "he comes" (or, in this case, "he does not come"). Therefore, in Italian, "He does not come here," would be "«(Lui) non viene qui.».

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CinziaL52

I meant not acceptale?

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CinziaL52

Would it be "Non venga qui?"

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

«Non venire qui.» is the imperative "Do not come here," for an informal "you," e.g. if you were telling your sibling or classmate not to come here. «Non venga qui.» is the imperative "Do not come here," for a formal "you," e.g. what you would use for a teacher, a boss, or anyone that is higher in you in rank or age that you would use the «Lei» form.

September 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/anastime

Duo is angry now Hahaha

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jar-JarJac

"Non venite qui" was accepted, could it actually be used with the same meaning as infinitive here?

March 4, 2018
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