"Azeeʼdíchʼííʼ daosą́ʼ."

Translation:Eat this chili pepper.

October 12, 2018

16 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maf654321

The translation varations for this are all off. Should accept 'chile', chili', 'chili pepper', 'hot chili', etc. inclusively and consistently for azeeʼdíchʼííʼ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

I reported it. After all this is still in the development stage. I have to look up pronunciation elsewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judorange123

Daohsá and da'ohsá are different: the first is "you(pl) eat it" while the second is "you(pl) eat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertBreu2

What happened to the audio portion of this program...no Navajo language pronumciations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kjbritt91

Is this an imperative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

Yáʼátʼééh! This is called the durative imperfective mode (the aspect and mode can occur in the verb), and it can be used for the imperative form, in the second person. This conjugation can be also called distributive plural:

The imperfective indicates an event/action that has begun but remains incomplete. Although this mode does not refer to tense, it is usually translated into English as a present tense form: yishááh "I'm (in the act of) going/coming", yishą́ "I'm (in the act of) eating (something)". With the additional of adverbials, the imperfective can be used for events/actions in the past, present, or future. The mode is used in the second person for immediate imperatives.

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Navajo_grammar


I think this is the spelling in Wiktionary:

daʼohsą́

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/daʼohsą́
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ayą́

Edit: Also, there is a form without the glottal stop:

daohsą́

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/yiyą́


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

Thanks again for another quality explanation.

Btw, I have loved watching your progression over the years. You have come a long way on Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeniaBrise

Thank you for explaining. Great help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ne_cede_malis

That's interesting... the only place I've encountered a durative case in a language before is in Akkadian (maybe it's also present in other Semitic and non-Indo-European languages though).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judorange123

It's a bit different here. Durative here is a class to which the verb belongs, and describes more its conjugation patterns than a meaning, a mode or a tense. This verb can be conjugated in the imperfective, perfective, future, optative... tenses or moods, but one can't choose another aspect (=class) than "durative".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

Yes, the verb is in an imperative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MexicoMadness

The drop-down explains this verb form is used when speaking to more than three people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan597269

I was dinged on my first answer of chili pepper, further into the exercise it is accepted...possibly a glitch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertBreu2

Agreed. "The translation varations for this are all off. Should accept 'chile', chili', 'chili pepper', 'hot chili', etc. inclusively and consistently for azeeʼdíchʼííʼ"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/britt3evans

Isn't a hot chili and chili pepper the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BDoubleL

"Eat this chili pepper" should be accepted.

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