"ʻO wai kēlā tūtū wahine?"

Translation:Who is that grandmother?

October 12, 2018

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

Does this mean "Whose grandmother is that?" or, like, "Who's that old woman?"

October 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam711804

"Who's that old woman" I think

October 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwasson

Is "tūtū wahine" used generically for older women, or would this only make sense at, like, a grandmothers' convention (or more realistically, an extended family gathering)?

October 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam711804

Fun fact, tūtū can also just be used by itself to mean grandmother, and you can specify tūtū kāne. But I think tūtū just generally means old woman.

October 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaleionaona

Tūtū can be used for both male and female grandparents. To make it more gender specific add kāne for male and wahine for female. Tūtū kāne = grandpa Tūtū wahine = grandma Kupuna kāne = grandfather Kupuna wahine = grandmother Kūpuna kāne = grandfathers (plural, more than 1, not possessive as in my grandfather's watch) Kūpuna wahine = grandmothers (plural meaning more than 1 grandmother, or someone like an grand aunt of that generation) 'Elemakule = old man Luahine = old woman

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darian219105

Those grandma conventions are almost as popular as comiccon theese days #Tutufest

November 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Who is the grandmother? as in What is her name? "Whose" is possession and uses a slightly different construction.

November 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

How do I know for sure that old woman is actually a grandmother if I don't already know who she is?

November 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

If this question makes sense to native Hawaiian speakers, which of the Islands of Hawaii pronounce the (Hawaiian W) with an English W sound and which pronounce it with an English V sound?

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Da_Majestic1

I've noticed the two different pronunciations also...
Here to learn the answer as well. Good question!

April 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldMath4

I don't think it differs by island. I was taught like English "w" after "o" and "u." Like Hawaiian v-sound after "i" and "e." Optional after "a" or initial, so "Hawa(i)'i" and "Hava(i)'i" both (or all four) OK, and either "waikīkī" or "vaikīkī". But I have never heard "pu'uwai" for "heart," always "pu'uvai," in spite of the "u" in front of it. Maybe "water" is never "wai," and that's why?

April 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emi451169

Am I the only one who can't listen to the recording? How can i fix this?

October 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kristenspeaking

Not the only one. I only hear it on my computer.

October 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NightmareE6

Wouldn't this question be kind of rude, because you might be assuming somebody's age?

June 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tutu124325

I believe that a comma would come after kela and before tūtū wahine to read as: Who is that, grandma? It might mKe kt clearer, but i m not sure they have punctuations except for voice inflection. As for the discussion on the rules for w sounds. I was taught if its at tbe beginning of a word or name it a -W-(wuh) sound. If its between two vowels its a -V- sounding w. Ergo Hawai'i is v Ha-vai-ee. Waikiki and Waianae, Waipahu, all have wuh sounds.

June 16, 2019
Learn Hawaiian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.