"Mahalo kēia hui ʻana."

Translation:I appreciate our meeting.

October 20, 2018

29 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pampelius

Can you add ʻana to any verb to make it a noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Most any, yes. It is a nominalizing particle. However, it is not always required to use the verb as a noun. For example, ʻōlelo means to speak, and so you can say kāna ʻōlelo ʻana (his speaking) or kāna ʻōlelo (his speech)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IPPSl411

I know the "acceptable" response is "I appreciate our meeting but purposely responed "I am thankful for this meeting" because it means the same thing and should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I'll accept "I am thankful for this meeting." I don't want you to lose hearts for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Could someone please explain why it is not "Mahalo no kēia hui ʻana." and likewise with "Mahalo ke Akua." vs "Mahalo i ke Akua." or "Mahalo e ke Akua." meaning Thank God. Mahalo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

"Mahalo i kēia hui ʻana" is grammatically correct, and is an accepted answer. It often happens that common phrases lose words (sometimes they get swallowed in speech) that you might expect if you are approaching the language from a more formal grammar perspective. "Mahalo ke Akua" is one of these cases. As someone who has learned the language in a classroom, I would expect the article of address, "e", to come before "ke Akua", but it is not usually heard that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kale345696

Aloha i think Duo long should look into teaching the "pigeon language" to understand Hawaiian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aalii5

Great question Lee. I was wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tupu466804

Mahalo kēia hui ‘ana... (BASICALLY SAYS) Thanks this meeting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heidi672278

Just wondering, why are there so many "Iesu pū" and "Ke Akua pū" in this lesson but no "You are welcome" and the likes? Coming from a region in Germany where "Grüß' Gott!" is used interchangeable with "Hello" or "Good day" I can see where it's coming from but I wouldn't expect "Grüß' Gott" to be taught in a German course. Is "Ke Akua pū" used as a common phrase to wish somebody well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zach_Factor

Is this a common thing to say in Hawai'i?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

The phrases "Mahalo ka hui ʻana" and "Mahalo kēia hui ʻana" are commonly heard among the poʻe Niʻihau when parting. The Niʻihau community is one of the few (if not the only) remaining community of native speakers with an unbroken line of language inheritance from their mākua and kūpuna.

Is it something you will commonly hear walking around just anywhere in Hawaiʻi? No.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

'A'ole/no. It is possible to say something like this, but this is not something everyone says in conversation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

How/Why is "kēia" used as "our"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

These are very loose translations, unlike other sentences. These polite expressions are very much colloquial, and they do not follow typical Hawaiian grammar and meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icdiva

Can it also mean "Thanks for meeting with me"...? I feel its qyite similar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GayleKilde

Is thanks the only correct answer? Thank you was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

It accepted it for me today, so someone must have at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenBartlett

First I am very appreciative of folks providing this new language course. I do find it hard to understand how the Duo algorithm would allow phrases such as "I appreciate our meeting" to be considered building block phrases to learning a language? I think with more usage the basic early lessons will change and reinforce more necessary and practical words and phrases encouraging the learner. Right now the lessons sometimes present a 3 phrase choice quiz on a phrase that has not been introduced and then it is introduced following the quiz. The basic pronouns are not clearly formally introduced but are part of phrase. I understand this is a free program (I do support it with the Plus donation) and this is an evolving class. BTW I was surprised at the early intro of religious phrases such as Jesus be with you. Also did not seem like necessary to a the basic first few lesson sections as many learners come from diverse backgrounds and cultural beliefs. I think to keep the learner motivated the time put in should yield as much success in understanding the basics of the language as possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

If people learn the language so they can connect with local people, then this phrase is VERY important! Ok, so it's not "where's the bathroom" or "another beer please."

Not sure any of us learning this language can judge at all what the most useful phrases are to learn. The native Hawaiians were forced into Christianity, as an indigenous people, and some adopted it. Hence, the Christian phrases are indeed useful. In other words, Judaism and Islam were not heavily promoted on the islands. Plus, isn't it interesting from a linguistic standpoint how the Hawaiian expression of the name Jesus is much more aligned with the "Jesu" European pronunciation (J/I) than the English/American (dge) pronounciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulHBZ

I just wanted to add a personal note to these interesting conversations--the peek into local culture and religion is one of the main reasons I became interested in this course, and I am also a plus user.

More broadly, I think we have to be careful talking about religion being "forced" on people. Modern economic systems and foreign political influence were forced but Christian conversion was, in the end, a choice of the people themselves (structural factors, including colonialism played their part, but nobody was baptized at the point of a gun).

Oceania is the most Christian region on earth. Just as the Arabic Duolingo lesson includes phrases like "Praise be to Allah," it makes sense to learn some idiomatic phrases here. And it erases people's agency to insist that their personally chosen religious ideas are "forced."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbigailRos155626

This is an awkward translation. It should be something like. Thanks for meeting (me) or thanks for our meeting. There is no au (I) in the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jason420111

Why does this also work for good seeing you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Because it is a conceptual/situational translation. What would someone from Ni‘ihau say when an English speaker says "Good seeing you" - apparently it is Mahalo ka hui ‘ana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Du4t2HMS

the equivalent of Pleased to meet you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

It's a little different, I think. I can say that in my personal experience, I usually hear this phrase "Mahalo kēia hui ʻana" or "Mahalo kēia launa ʻana o kākou" at the end of conversation, rather than at the beginning. Listening to recordings from the radio show, Ka Leo Hawaiʻi, I have sometimes heard similar phrases like "Hauʻoli kēia hui ʻana" used at the beginning of conversation. And they're not phrases used only for meeting someone for the first time. Folks can listen to Ka Leo Hawaiʻi here: http://ulukau.org/kaniaina/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samara630612

Would it make sense to say it is similar to saying, "nice to meet you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I'll copy my reply to a previous comment above:

It's a little different, I think. I can say that in my personal experience, I usually hear this phrase "Mahalo kēia hui ʻana" or "Mahalo kēia launa ʻana o kākou" at the end of conversation, rather than at the beginning. Listening to recordings from the radio show, Ka Leo Hawaiʻi, I have sometimes heard similar phrases like "Hauʻoli kēia hui ʻana" used at the beginning of conversation. And they're not phrases used only for meeting someone for the first time. Folks can listen to Ka Leo Hawaiʻi here: http://ulukau.org/kaniaina/

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