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"Debajo de la mesa"

Translation:Below the table

1
5 years ago

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/heatherlp717

Does "debajo de la mesa" have the same double meaning as "under the table?" Does it imply something done in secret?

142
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quekan

Sí, tiene ambas connotaciones.

155
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkiaSim

hey,

English often skirts around a given idea by utilizing many completely different words which have an indirect association of a given idea and occur as facets of it, as it were. Often the core idea does not even have a specific English word and may only be understood by an entire sentence needed to explain it.

Spanish is entirely different. It does not skirt around a given idea by hosting a variety of nuances relative a core idea. Instead, it utilizes the core key word directly and adopts it to all possible situations it applies.

For example, let's take the Spanish word, "duro."

What does duro mean? Duolingo simplies it by using the word, "hard." Whereas in English duro can mean,.hard, tough, harsh, difficult, stiff, severe, hardcore, strong, stale, stern, stubborn, unkind, intensive, adamant, hard-hearted, hard-boiled. Duro means all these total different English words. And they all together, combined, are what duro actual means.

To really understand what duro means at its core beyond the simple idea of its meaning, "hard," it is necessry to crunch all the various possible English translations together in one's mind, then mush them up running them in a blender, as it were, so you get a single flavored soup. Then you will have what the Spanish word means.

Look at the above list. Work out the common idea. You may see that it pertains to.something that cannot be changed. It innately resiststs being alftered in any way. It cannot be transformed. Or effected. And this enduring condition automatically naturally provides a sense of rigidity or firmness. This is what duro means and pertans to. And so the word, duro, can be used in any situation which this fundamental idea concerns. No variety of other words required Duro includes them all.

Many Spanish words work this same way.

English applies a variety of variations on a given theme, Spanish does not, but goes right to the heart of a matter. This is why it is a waste time, energy, and mental power focusing on the many different ways something can be said in English. The focus is best placed on understanding the all encompassing Spanish idea for which there often is no accurate English translation, but only words skirting it

PS:Hope this helps : )

84
Reply61 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubescube

That was a lot of info to take in at once.

6
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Sure, but you can ignore it.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellen892121

That was very helpful. Thank you.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindPradhan

Tax evasion today, revolución tomorrow! Way to go DL!

17
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinJacob4

Or the idiom, i can drink you under the table?

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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The sentence I had just before this was: la reina y el rey beben el vino

6
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zak869317

Maby?

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

Does "debajo la mesa" have the same meaning and is it correct? Or, put another way, is the 'de' necessary or optional?

36
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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It's needed, as it is with other positional phrases like "atras de" (behind/in back of).

45
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xXx_Zyzz_xXx

So anything that is a position needs "de"?

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Jan 7, 2015 Spanish has all sorts of prepositions, just like English. Only some of them are compound prepositions. Check this out: http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/compound_prep.htm

And look here for simple prepositions. http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/compound_prep.htm

Hope that helps!

33
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LyricalPeach

Thanks for the links but they are both the same link. Do you mind reposting the link for the simple prepositions?

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Here you go: http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/prepositions.htm

That whole website should be helpful to you. :-)

March 13,2015

13
13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LyricalPeach

Thanks, I really appreciate it! :)

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
sandeepa2
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Hola Eloise23, muchas gracias por los sitos web muy útiles

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neil-VA5SCA

Can't reply to your next comment, but the link there points to the example 'El perro está bajo la mesa.' That isn't helping! :)

I can only assume that Spanish is sometimes as slippery as English.

2
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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I see what you mean! Definitely, it can be slippery! These words for under do overlap somewhat. With some further searching, here's another extensive discussion: https://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/16650/what-is-the-difference-between-abajo-debajo-and-bajo

I think my strategy will be to use them the best I can, and allow the Spanish locals to correct me. :-)

0
10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SonarShoal

Isn't this a preposition? I'm a bit confused with it's placement in "Adverbs"...

17
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian238

Underneath is said to be both a preposition and an adverb in English so the confusion isn't just in Spanish. Underneath is almost always a preposition in English except in some fairly contrived sentences that only make sense if you know the context. Example: "He ducked underneath." There are several other words in this "adverb" grouping that are also potential prepositions so it's probably best to leave that discussion to the grammar police and just learn how to use the words.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/umtablefor1pls

Truee

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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The only preposition is "de"; "debajo" is an adverb.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EFrisco
EFrisco
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The immanent Roman gramarian Servius once observed that, Omnia pars orationis migrat in adverbium -All parts of speech become adverbs.

In the case of prepositional phrases, they can frequently be used to modify the sense of a verb. Just think how the addition of this phrase 'debajo de la mesa' changes the sense of the verb in the sentance 'Ellos pagan'.

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/njmatthewkelly

Hey, that's where I usually keep my pig!

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abe.raise

"Debajo de la mesa" also means off the books.

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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lo mismo en inglés. He was paid under the table. (no taxes withheld)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yepawilli

What is wrong with bajo de la mesa

10
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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«Bajo de» is wrong. «Bajo la mesa» is correct but it can mean I lower the table too. It's better to stick with «debajo de».

22
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Bajo means "low" or "short", so saying "low of the table" doesn't make sense.

Debajo means underneath or below, and it comes along with "de"

16
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morgens2

The prepositions lesson taught us that bajo means "under" too. Why doesn't that work here?

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hokusai_1
Hokusai_1
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In my opinion, Spanish is like a kind of klay, they ad something on a basic word and it becomes another word, bajo=low DEbajo=underneath besar=kiss besame=kiss me in Spanish they do this frequently poner=to put ponerse=to put on pontelo=put it on I hope it helps

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolishMathew
PolishMathew
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But a few lessons earlier there was a sentence "¿Qué tienes bajo la camisa?" And the translation was "What do you have under the shirt?"

30.06.15

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atntony
atntony
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"under the table" was accepted

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tan43
tan43
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So what's the difference between "bajo" and "debajo"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

I recall just "bajo" being used for under.... could you also use just "bajo" instead of "debajo" in this sentence?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Som1one

would 'abajo de la mesa" also work?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Oct 23, 2015 - Thank you! I hadn't realized that I was confusing those!

From a Spaniard:

Bajo - influence. It is under drug effects.

Abajo - direction. To demolish the building - to take it down.

Debajo (de) - position. It is below the picture.

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/bajo-abajo-debajo.1863190/

So, to answer your question, 'abajo de la mesa' does not work.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aneelkkhatri

How about "Bajo la mesa"?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aheadfullofwords

Does "debajo" and "bajo" have the same meaning?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Feb 21, 2016 - check out this discussion: http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/140096/debajo-vs.-bajo

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro.Ronaldo

What about "From under the table."

1
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rukshia.s

Can you say Below the desk?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Desk is escritorio.

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lonewolf969

Why there is a "De" usage here ?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

"Debajo de" is a fixed phrase in spanish

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tankster52

"Debajo de la mesa" ...comó se dice "if you know what I mean"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frankensteindel

so "sobre" and "Debajo" mean the same thing?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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"Sobre" = on top of, relating to, above

"Debajo" = underneath, beneath

March 30, 2015

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

I wasn't sure how to say this to i pushed the record button and played the recording....and it worked. Loophole!

0
Reply53 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelicareal44
angelicareal44
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Under the table is correct??

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Si

0
Reply3 years ago