1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Hawaiian
  4. >
  5. "He kāne Hawaiʻi ʻo ia."

"He kāne Hawaiʻi ʻo ia."

Translation:He is a Hawaiian man.

October 27, 2018

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nngpi

Didn't check, but could you technically translate this as "She is a Hawaiian man" (as in "The person you're referring to as she is actually not a she")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oruga_fantasma

I think technically the more accurate translation would be "It is a Hawaiian man". You can draw your own conclusions...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaleiPanda

" ʻo ia " , at least in this case", is refering to a person so you would't use "it". ʻo ia isn't tied to a specific gender though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/webbie9

They is the singular nongendered pronoun in english for humans


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvaderZimRules

I suppose so, because 'o ia means both He and She. Even though if you said She is a Hawaiian man, it wouldn't make much sense, unless it's like a man pretending to be a girl, or something crazy like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talmerian

Why is a man presenting as a woman crazy to you? Perhaps you should seek some assistance with your judgements of others and how to not label the unfamiliar as 'crazy'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaleiPanda

words like " ʻo ia, kona, ect." aren't tied to a specific gender... but it's saying that " ʻo ia" is a man so you would use he.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nngpi

Thanks for answering! It's certainly possible to say "She is a Hawaiian man" in English though, for example:

  • I saw you with another woman last night. Who was she?
  • "She" is actually a Hawaiian man, and he's been a family friend for as long as I can remember.

I presume you could have more or less the same conversation in Hawaiian, except that 'he' and 'she' would both become "ʻo ia".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talmerian

I tried that, acceptable as a translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beth362866

He is an Hawaiian man did not work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaleiPanda

I think that has to do more with English grammar. "a" and "an" mean the same thing, it just depends on what follows it. Hope this helped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdBonsey

"An" usually precedes a noun beginning with a vowel, however, growing up in Hawai`i I was taught that "an Hawaiian" was correct; an exception to the rule.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike421411

Would be good if we could collapse the correction when we are wrong so as to see what our mistake was.

Learn Hawaiian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.