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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exp271828

My Favorite German Word for the Week ...

... is das Schlagzeug (aka die Trommel)! Finally, a -zeug word I really like! (Close runner-up was der Schlagzeuger ...)

What's your favorite word you've learned (any language) this week?

October 28, 2018

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorel90

My all time favorite German word is Krankenhaus, it sounds funny in English. I told the nurses in the hospital "this is a Krankenhaus" and they told, yes everyone here is cranky, I told them that it means hospital in German.

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Since I am a nurse, I always thought Krankenschwester was funny.

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

Way back when nursing was done by nuns = sisters. Actually you still find them in some hospitals.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorel90

It makes sense. Thanks

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorel90

It is funny.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon264644

Eichhörnchen and Flughörnchen! (squirrel and flying squirrel) Try to pronounce them fast!

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/npLam

das Schagzeug

I think you've lost an l

: )

October 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exp271828

yep - got that fixed, danke!

October 28, 2018

[deactivated user]

    My favourite German word is 'Schmetterling' (butterfly). It sounds so aggresive, you wouldn't think it was something as harmless as that. :D

    October 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

    Strange -- I don't find that "Schmetterling" sounds aggressive at all. Do you think "butterfly" sounds aggressive? It's got the same cadence as "Schmetterling" and is phonetically quite similar, but starts with a plosive "b" rather than a soft "sch" sound. "Sch" is used in many cultures to encourage silence or to calm an agitated person, so to me it's practically the opposite of an aggressive sound -- still, these things are always rather subjective.

    dqxxmvyvoedn

    October 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

    pont - I agree, it depends how you say it. You can say it as though the wings were gently flapping.

    October 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jileha

    “(Zer)schmettern” means “to smash”.

    October 28, 2018

    [deactivated user]

      That is true but Germans roll their ‘r’s making it sound harsh. What I really find significant is the fact that the verb ‘schmettern or ‘zerschmettern’ means to smash. How such a strong action can turn into something as innocent as a butterfly is beyond me. I guess that’s what makes German such a unique language

      October 28, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jileha

      Did you read my post about the etymology? It has nothing to do with the verb "schmettern" but with the butter used in butterfly. The etymology is simply not know by most people and they tend to think of the negative connotations of "schmettern".

      October 29, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

      That is true but Germans roll their ‘r’s making it sound harsh.

      The rolled "r" is really only common in the more southerly German-speaking areas. Depending on the region, there are two common pronunciations of the German "r": an uvular trill (as also used in French, Dutch, Portuguese, etc.), and an alveolar trill (as also used in Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Czech, Finnish, etc.) -- this is the one generally referred to as a "rolled r". So if you truly find that a rolled "r" is enough to make a language harsh, rather a lot of European languages should be sounding harsh to you.

      How such a strong action can turn into something as innocent as a butterfly is beyond me.

      Jileha already expained before your post that "Schmetterling" comes from a word for cream. It's got nothing to do with "zerschmettern".

      I guess that’s what makes German such a unique language

      That kind of thing isn't really unique to German. If you want an English example of something comparable, look at the word "crush". It can mean "violent compression or pressure that bruises, breaks down, injures, or destroys". It can also mean "a person with whom one is enamoured or infatuated". How such a violent action can turn into something so innocent is beyond me ;-).

      dqxxmvyvoedn

      October 29, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jileha

      Your post made me look up the etymology. Turns out "Schmetterling" is actually closely related to "butterfly"!

      Schmetterling die Bezeichnung des Falters ist seit dem 16. Jh. gebräuchlich und leitet sich von dem mitteldeutschen Wort Schmetten „Rahm“ ab, das seinerseits auf čech. smetana „Milch“ zurückgeht; die Benennung stützt sich auf den alten Volksglauben, nach dem Schmetterlinge verwandelte Hexen seien, die Milch und Sahne stahlen; regional wird der Schmetterling auch als Buttervogel bezeichnet, vgl. dazu engl. butterfly

      https://www.wissen.de/wortherkunft/schmetterling

      October 28, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont

      den alten Volksglauben, nach dem Schmetterlinge verwandelte Hexen seien, die Milch und Sahne stahlen

      Danke für die Recherchen! Das erinnert an die merkwürdigen Volksglauben, die dem Ziegenmelker seinen auffallenden Namen verliehen haben.

      dqxxmvyvoedn

      October 29, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sweilan1

      Favorite German word - Papperlapapp

      October 29, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

      My favorite word is Leerlaufgemischregulierschraube

      October 28, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hubert802318

      Technische Begriffe sind oftmals großartige Komposita.

      Sogar die ganz normalen Abkürzungen PKW und LKW sind genial. Personenkraftwagen und Lastkraftwagen.

      Und in der Mechanik haben sie viele schöne Begriffe, da wird Deutsch fast zu einer agglutinierenden Sprache.

      October 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exp271828

      Gonna guess without looking it up - something to do with regulating something on an engine? It's got to be technical!

      October 28, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannibal-Barkas

      idle mixture-control screw, that's s definitely technical, not every day German

      October 28, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elderwanda

      Not a word, but a phrase. "Verteidigung Gegen die Dunklen Künste", which is the name of Harry Potter's class "Defence Against the Dark Arts."

      October 30, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan645976

      I just love to say Kartoffeln

      October 30, 2018
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