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  5. "Who is that grandmother?"

"Who is that grandmother?"

Translation:ʻO wai kēlā tūtū wahine?

November 4, 2018

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laamaikahi

Why is ʻkupunahineʻ accepted for this senctence but not the other sentences that have ʻgrandmaʻ in it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangakoibito

In general on Duolingo missing but valid answers are the kind of thing that is common in beta courses because of how the system works. Standard procedure is to report it so that they can add it to the list of accepted answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Please report it. Mahalo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lei750333

How do i add kahakos over the vowels? Do i need to dowload app?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcee15

Incase you didn't get an answer... Hold the vowel down until the box pops up above the vowel, slide you finger over to vowel with the kokakõ over it... The o is the only one I don't seem to have one for hence, õ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FudgeTasty

Just wondering. Why is the order the same order as it would be in English for this specific sentence? All the other sentence structures I've noticed have been mixed to Nebraska and back... "Who is That Grandma"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

The interrogative pronoun wai (who) is fronted like most other languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe610454

Is this being phrased as a question to the grandmother, as in 'Who is that, Grandmother?' Or is it asking who a particular grandmother is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brad930596

It's asking who a particular grandmother is. Hawaiian puts "E" before addressing someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcee15

Kupuahine is the proper Hawaiian name for Grandmother... Why are you using tūtū... The is no T in our alphabet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

kupunahine is fine and yet so is tūtū. The sounds t and k are mostly interchangeable as was the case pre-contact. It was the missionaries who decided to keep K and throw out T. The Ni‘ihau native speakers use both.

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