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"J'aime m'entraîner."

Translation:I like to exercise.

4 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zbouaerg
zbouaerg
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Shouldn't "work out" be also acceptable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Maybe "faire de l'exercise". But "work out" is also accepted here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankOvares

That's what I thought the translation to "I like to exercise" would be because "s'entrainer (accented) sounds more like "to train for something, a game, a fight, a competition of some sort" or "to condition oneself"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daev3000
daev3000
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It's accepted now.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alastair17
Alastair17
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I like to train myself?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/codiggity

I think it's because in English we wouldn't say it like that. Ya know?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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The French use a reflexive verb here but in English, there is no reference to "myself" whenever the action of the verb is done without assistance.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julibowman

OK, someone just clarified that aimer is to love, and it is absolute. Only a qualifier would "reduce" it to like (e.g. aimer+bien) or something like that. Now I put "I love to exercise", and it's wrong. I find aimer to be a moving target.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juan-Manue1
Juan-Manue1
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This has worked for me: aimer person = love; aimer qualifier person = like; aimer non-person = like; adore non-person = love.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lgalarra
lgalarra
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This rule seems useful. I had deduced it somehow and never wrote explicitly. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/queenmaja

I wrote "work out" without even thinking about it. For english speakers i'd say it's the most natural translation, so, yo, duolingo, change dat!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randonneur3
Randonneur3
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Pardon, read: for american english speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pattyclarke

If you believe Wikipedia, 85% of native English speakers are American.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannrkelley

Welp, duo is the only time I'll be using THIS sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/contrl

"J'aime m'entraîner mon palais." Never has my gluttony sounded so classy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rocteur
Rocteur
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J'aime entraîner mon palais ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noideasleft
noideasleft
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I like to keep fit...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rocteur
Rocteur
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That is the outcome but not what is said!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prachi.munde

Is this a reflexive verb?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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It is used reflexively here in French, but in English, one does not make a reference to "myself".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/etoh49
etoh49
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Does the verb "entrainer" always have a reflexive sort of pronoun. If I exercised my dogs, could I use this verb to express it ? Could I have a direct object? I'm not asking this very well.
Here's my scenario: I have an ill-behaved dog. He tears up furniture and drags trash from the poubelle, and if he's left alone in my home for an hour by himself he poops on the floor, yada, yada, yada. I call Cesar Millan (Dog Whisperer) who tells me he is some sort of mixed "working" breed and he needs to feel that he has a job. Cesar instructs me to buy some doggie saddle bags, put liters of bottled water in the pockets, and instead of taking the dog for a walk , to exercise him. The weighted water bottles are of just the right weight for the dog to be too tired to spend his alone time looking for mischief. TMI and not a true story, but I saw Cesar recommend something of that sort.

How would I say in French, ["I must exercise my dog."] Je dois m'entrainer mon chien? I want to emphasize that it's more than taking a walk, I need to exercise him.

Please help.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pattyclarke

Entrainer is transitive, and always takes a direct object: "Je dois entrainer mon chien," or "Je dois l'entrainer." Lots of "reflexive" verbs are like this.

I think the emphasis on reflexive verbs when learning French has more to do with the fact that in English omitting the direct object means the verb is secretly reflexive: "I train (myself)" vs "I train my dog". In French, verbs tend to either require an object or not --- always. If they require one, you can't just omit it when the "object" of the verb is the "agent".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/etoh49
etoh49
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Thank you! I think I'm beginning to understand. 1. The m' in the original sentence is the direct object of the sentence. 2. The l' in "Je dois l'entrainer." is also a direct object, but it means "him" (my dog). Am I correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pattyclarke

Perfect :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/etoh49
etoh49
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Now I need to study transitive and reflexive verbs. Merci encore! : )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carla765927

I put love!! what wrong? ??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4
Multi0Lingual4
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"J'aime" means "I like" not "I love."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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If you want to say that you love doing something, use the verb "adorer". When "aimer" is followed by an infinitive, it is understood as "to like". This is the approach used throughout this course.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MouliCha
MouliCha
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Can't we write it as "j'aime entraîner"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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No, because it needs a complement. So if you are working out, you use the verb "s'entraîner" as shown in this sentence: J'aime m'entraîner.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetroWestJP
MetroWestJP
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Could someone please explain the use of circumflex (î) and umlaut (ï) accents over the letter i in French? I'm guessing the umlaut in haïr is to separate the vowel sounds (as in Spanish bilingüe), but why the circumflex in entraîner? This might be explained in the notes, but the notes are not available in the Android app. Merci!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenHagan1

(Dictation) At full speed, the male voice pronounces the final e of j'aime and it sounds like j'aimais m'entrainer, which is both possible and wrong. :(

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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It's just a different accent -- one that is common in the South of France.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LesAussi

Why not? -- "I like my exercise."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Because "m'entraîner" is a verb here, not a noun.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShahriarAl
ShahriarAl
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"I like to train myself" still not accepted December 15th 2017

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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And it won't be because even though the French uses a reflexive verb, it is not used that way in natural English. One would simply say "I like to exercise" or "I like to work out". There is no reference to "self" in English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amit331046

Why not practice?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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One can "practice" just about anything but when you're talking about "J'aime m'entraîner", it is understood that you're working out (exercising), not practicing the piano, etc.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lgrashof
lgrashof
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I have to share this, even if only one person reads it. I heard "J'aime mon trainer" and laughed hard when I saw the correct answer.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnNorthrop1

The m' leads you to believe it should be 'I like MY exercise' - as per the drop down - but it won't have it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobTheTriangle

if you YOURSELF like to exercise, then you'd put m in front of the verb, which in this case is exercise, but you have to translate I like TO exercise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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The « m' » shows you that the French verb is being used reflexively. It is not an abbreviation for "mon". English does not require nor would it typically use any reference to "self" at all here.

2 months ago