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  5. "qamwIj yISopQo'!"

"qamwIj yISopQo'!"

Translation:Don't eat my foot!

November 5, 2018

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockhyrax

"muchoppu', vumpu' QIp - Ha'DIbaH non jIH - HaHaHaHaHa". (Corrections welcome, particularly on the correct translation of "you stupid jerks", or a better word for "tainted".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

I don't know what this is a translation of. However, if you're trying to say You bit me, you stupid jerks, it would be tuchoppu', vumpu' QIp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockhyrax

Ah yes, listening back to the video, the exact words were "I've been bitten, you stupid p***ks - I'm tainted meat." But how come "you bit me" has the -pu' at the end? This is something I've been confused by before. Is the "you have bitten me" form to be used if the bite has just been carried out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

This course teaches perfective wrong. Klingon perfective (-pu' and -ta') isn't equal to English perfect tenses (have done, had done, will have done), but that's what the course teaches.

Actually, Klingon perfective indicates that an action is completed, regardless of when it is completed, past or future. Consider the viewpoint of the sentence, and decide whether, at the moment occupied by that viewpoint, the verb is describing a completed action. If it is, then a perfective suffix is required.

You bit me in English is a perfective sentence. But English doesn't generally indicate perfective by a simple verb conjugation, so you have to figure out what is perfective and what isn't. In You bit me, the viewpoint is the moment the sentence is uttered; at that moment, the biting is already done, so it is perfective. tuchoppu' You bit me, you have bitten me. The Klingon doesn't actually specify WHEN the biting happens, so without context this could just as easily mean You will have bitten me. You can add context to give greater meaning: lup puS ret tuchoppu'! You bit me a few seconds ago! wa'leS tuchoppu'. Tomorrow you will have bitten me.

So again, don't just go by whether English is using simple past tense or a perfect tense. Determine whether the action is completed during the viewpoint the sentence takes.

Unfortunately, most sentences in this course DO, in fact, falsely equate Klingon perfective and English perfect tenses, so you'll have to enter wrong answers sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rockhyrax

Thanks very much for the detailed reply. To test my understanding, I have a just couple of further questions: Is this correct for "I saw a tribble, then I couldn't breathe": {yIH vIleghpu' qhIq jItlhuHlaHbe'} because I saw the tribble, and after I'd got away from it (and so didn't see it any more) I found myself out of breath, but I'm not saying anything about how long this lasted? But what about {yIH vIleghmo' jItlhuHlaHbe'} - "I couldn't breathe because I saw a tribble"? Does this leave the question of whether I was still seeing the tribble open, as does the English version, or does it imply I'm still seeing the tribble? In either case, would a -pu' before the -mo' remove any ambiguity by putting the tribble sighting in the past?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

Is this correct for "I saw a tribble, then I couldn't breathe": {yIH vIleghpu' qhIq jItlhuHlaHbe'} because I saw the tribble, and after I'd got away from it (and so didn't see it any more) I found myself out of breath, but I'm not saying anything about how long this lasted?

You've got it exactly.

But what about {yIH vIleghmo' jItlhuHlaHbe'} - "I couldn't breathe because I saw a tribble"? Does this leave the question of whether I was still seeing the tribble open, as does the English version, or does it imply I'm still seeing the tribble?

It's all about viewpoint. I would say that the viewpoint of *I couldn't breathe because I saw a tribble" would be the moment of seeing the tribble if I were telling a story -- think of it as the "historical present tense" of English storytelling: "And at that moment, I see a tribble, and I can't breathe!" Or the viewpoint might be the present moment, when you're telling me something that were completed before the current viewpoint: "And at that moment, I saw a tribble [a completed seeing] and I couldn't breathe [during that moment, not a completed inability to breathe]."

But the Klingon isn't as flexible as the English. yIH vIleghmo' jItlhuHlaHbe' explicitly is NOT perfective, which means it cannot be describing an action completed. Whatever the current viewpoint is, the seeing and the inability to breathe are neither one of them completed. Whereas, in yIH vIleghpu'mo' jItlhuHlaHbe', you have a completed seeing and a not-completed inability to breathe.

You may not be able to tell the difference between these in English, but the difference is quite clear in Klingon.

In either case, would a -pu' before the -mo' remove any ambiguity by putting the tribble sighting in the past?

Not the past, necessarily, just "completed." You might be talking about a viewpoint in the future, in which case the seeing is completed in the future, but before the viewpoint. wa'leS yIH So'lu'pu'bogh leghpu'DI' HoD, tlhuHlaHbe'! Tomorrow, when the captain will have seen the hidden tribble, he won't be able to breathe! More smoothly translated: When the captain sees the hidden tribble tomorrow, he won't be able to breathe!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qov-jIH-je

How did this sentence end up in the section on farming? Just a reminder that wIj has two meanings, or is it Duolingo bug? The hints do tag it as -wIj not wIj.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

When you click on the Actions drop down menu (like you were going to do some audio), select "View sentence tags". The hints are like the audio and based on the spelling and nothing else. But when a sentence is created, we tag it with which version of that word we want to use. Someone accidently tagged this -wIj with the tag for the wIj from the food lesson (which is a different wIj), so Duolingo determined that was the best place for the sentence. I'll try to get around to replacing when I get a chance.

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