https://www.duolingo.com/carbsrule

The hardest parts

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In your experience, what are the hardest parts of learning Esperanto?

I know a lot of people struggle with the accusative, and with the reflexive pronoun, and some are daunted by the correlatives. Anything else?

4 months ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Catuvolci
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Finding someone in person to talk to.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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This is a feature, not a bug. Esperanto is common enough that you can find people just about anywhere. It's rare enough that when you do, they're REALLY REALLY glad to meet you.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WitlessBittern
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The first time it happens to me I expect I'll be so excited I'll forget how to speak it. "Mi parolas... uhhh..."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carbsrule
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Mi neniam havis tian problemon.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Transitivity of verbs.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoKin9

Perhaps part-of-speech category of roots? Many are pretty straightforward ("patr" is a noun root, "est" is a verb root, "bon" is an adjective root), but then you have the rare two-category roots like "arm" and "plant" or roots that different sources disagree on the category of like "glu." The net effect is that you always have to memorize the category for each root separately, or redundantly use affixes when you aren't sure. (Sure, "armilo" is redundant when "armo" also means the same thing, but at least it's easy to come up with on the spot.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
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Transitivity is the hardest thing or at least the thing that I get wrong the most often ( not that i don't get everything else wrong too)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lectroidmarc

Correlatives, for sure. Especially when there's not a 1:1 relation to English. But what still gets me are prepositions. Much of Esperanto's vocabulary is recognizable (to me) from roots that are familiar (English, Latin, French, German...). Esperanto's prepositions are from something else so there's no quick way for me to remember them.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WitlessBittern
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Being mindful of the subject vs. object. Remembering the accent marks. Everything you mentioned in your original post.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glavisto

Correlatives. No doubt about it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

Dealing with the same questions people ask over and over again, e.g. isn't English already the international language? Why are you wasting your time learning a language that nobody speaks?

;-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WitlessBittern
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...Can I change my answer? I pick this.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

In the Toronto club, we made a joke, as in "Ah, Question Number 36!"

Seriously, though, for me it wasn't necessarily using transitivity, it was (and still is) running into the verbs where I can't figure out the transitivity without looking it up.

Also when I handwrite in Esperanto, for some unknown reason, I write the letter "j" to look like a deformed letter "y". And then I just put a dot over it and hope nobody notices.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikhil3
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For me it is still the use of accusative. I am used to reflexive pronouns thanks to French. I am trying to get my hands on the correlatives. But it can still be a bit confusing at times.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikhil3
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Oh, I forgot to add on thing. Even the adverbial clauses can be quite tricky

Esperanto uses far more adverbs than English in my experience.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carbsrule
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Oh yeah, I think that did trip me up occasionally, early on

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/computervirus99

Finding someone I can have regular verbal practice with.

My skills often deteriorate quickly because I don't actually ever use it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keirwilliams

Participles. Only just started to get my head around them 3 years after learning Esperanto. Lernu's guide really helped, but still have someway to go to understanding.

4 months ago
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