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  5. "Es ist ganz neu."

"Es ist ganz neu."

Translation:It is totally new.

April 3, 2013

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen4Morrissey

Surely 'quite' works here too? It can be used to mean either 'rather' or 'very' in English ('I'm quite all right'), like 'ganz' can in German, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeGodf

While in your example 'quite' could be exchanged with 'very' to give a similar meaning here it can't. Isn't "I'm quite all right" an example of an understatement used for emphasis that has fallen in to common usage anyway?

On a scale from -1 to 1 'quite' is at about 0.2 whereas 'very' is around 0.6.

After looking it up, I think it might be that 'ganz' has a definition close to 'quite' as an adverb and close to 'totally' as an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boycey48

Same. I'm not sure why sometimes ganz = quite and sometimes not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelWil839654

If you think about it, the word 'quite' in English can also mean 'rather; a little; fairly, etc.' OR 'absolutely, totally, etc., but we can only normally tell the difference by listening to the emphasis when the word is spoken: so 'QUITE new' when spoken has a different meaning to 'quite NEW'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amora344949

It is brand new, in my opinion should be the best translation of this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamiroF.

What does that mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamiroF.

Does Brand new work?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Korkodush

It is brand new.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmramna

ganz - Totally sehr - very

difference between ganz and alle/alles?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastibuns

"Es ist ganz neu, duuuuude," should also be an option, with the amount of 'u's expressing your enthusiasm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJ1856

I put ganz = quite and lost a heart. The online German-English dictionary says ganz can be used for 'quite'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bharad.kv

Quite is accepted now. (May 2015)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicolaeBaciu

Shouldn't the English expression be :"It is brand new"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
  • 1472

This is the answer I entered, and it was accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benMath08

Would "It is all new" be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtalinaDove

To me, "It is all new" sounds like everything is new, rather than it being completely new, which I think is more the connotation of ganz.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeRoution

Every iPhone since the 4s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillyPossum

Odd. I was marked correct for putting 'quite', which, as others have noted, is one meaning of 'ganz'. But this can't be correct if Duo's chosen correct answer is 'totally' - a quite new car is very different from a totally new car??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PlamenBG

ganz=absolutely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brasil2004

No. Ganz=full,all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erlkoenig

Actually, it could be used as "absolutely". I submitted "totally" and got it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IowaHawkeye

Is there a specific difference between ganz and völlig?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PunkJesus

völlig = approximately


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SumSum767517

Sometimes they are practically synonyms, at least in casual use. Sometimes they aren't even close to having the same meaning.

'Ganz gut' is not completely good but 'ganz neu' is completely new, for example. Völlig always has a 'complete' meaning, which means you can only substitute it with ganz when ganz also has the 'complete' meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qian_Wei

I wrote "It is whole new" and it's wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lai_mesunda

English grammar states that when whole is used as an adverb (since it modifies new, an adjective), it takes the form wholly. I'm not quite sure why it didn't accept wholly though. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anklyosaurid

No one would ever use the word "wholly." If they do, it is so infrequent that I've never even heard it. They would say "entirely".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimWilding

There's nothing wrong with 'wholly'; good English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lai_mesunda

I read too much classical literature, I guess. I agree with you, though. "Entirely" is better than "wholly" since it's more common. ^.^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/masovnasarana

It is entirely new worked for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NasirIqbal

What is the difference betweem "it" and "this"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erlkoenig

"it" = "es" "this" = "das"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SumSum767517

As far as I've seen, Duo usually only translates 'this' as 'das', but it can also mean 'dies/e/r'. It's the difference between distance that this and that also show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RileyGamin

Could you also use "Sehr" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desivy38

Totally can be a sarcastic phrase. How do German's express sarcasm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauersegler

As a native speaker: In the sarcastic meaning I would say: Es ist ja wirklich alles neu - es ist ja wohl alles auf dem neuesten Stand. Oder noch besser: Hier ist ja wirklich alles neu/auf dem neuesten Stand. With hier = here I get the comparison with the real situation - so the meaning should be clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crazycatlady552

What is the difference between ganz and total? "Es ist total lustig."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AMarieTS

Why not "it is brand new"?

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