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  5. "Mahalo ka hui ʻana."

"Mahalo ka hui ʻana."

Translation:Good seeing you.

November 12, 2018

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Why is it not Mahalo i ka hui ‘ana. or Mahalo no ka hui ‘ana. ? Likewise, why is it Mahalo ke Akua and not Mahalo i ke Akua. or Mahalo e ke Akua. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

"Mahalo i ka hui ʻana" is grammatically correct, and is an accepted answer. It often happens that common phrases lose words (sometimes they get swallowed in speech) that you might expect if you are approaching the language from a more formal grammar perspective. "Mahalo ke Akua" is one of these cases. As someone who has learned the language in a classroom, I would expect the article of address, "e", to come before "ke Akua", but it is not usually heard that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

So maybe when answers (or alternative ones) are given you could put the grammatically correct (but sort of optional) words in parentheses? That would sure help us peeps who are sticklers for rules and are trying to figure out inconsistencies!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonNouchi

ʻAe, as it is here "ka hui ʻana" is the one doing the mahalo-ing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

I don't understand why it can't mean thank you for the meeting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SDB333

It actually accepts that now. Itʻs what I put and it was marked correct with "Good seeing you" given as an alternate correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Maika'i e ike 'ia 'oe. "Good to see you."

Mahalo ka hui 'ana. "[I] appreciate the meeting."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

So I looked up "e ike 'ia 'oe" and it sure seems like that would be a better thing to teach since even Duolingo's dictionary says it means "...to see you." Why isn't this used instead - is it not a common phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I agree. Hau'oli au e ike 'ia 'oe has been a common expression on O'ahu for as long as I can remember. Last year on my trip to Hilo, someone at UH said Hau'oli kēia hui 'ana kāua when we departed. Do you think it is regional?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moikeha1

Why not “maika'i e 'ike iā 'oe” ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Tita4U

That's what I expected also but these translations are way out in left field kinda different. What you said, made way more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

That is a literal translation, and I do not think it would be something people would say like that. Yet because people really do not say Mahalo ka hui ‘ana anyway, you may still have a point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily651625

Anyone else notice it switchs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

The phrases "Mahalo (i) ka hui ʻana" and "Mahalo (i) kēia hui ʻana" are commonly heard among the poʻe Niʻihau when parting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyRose232636

In Niʻihau perhaps, but much of the language used in Niʻihau is different that what is used on other islands. They even used the t-sound in place of k in many words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexis_cannon79

what is po'e Ni'ihau?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

The people from the island of Ni‘ihau, a private island where only 200 people live, an island that you cannot visit without permission in advance. Not sure why they are including expressions that 99.9% of the people in the world would not be able to hear since so few have access to that place and those people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

These phrases are not only used by Niʻihau people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill207539

What is the difference between hui ‘ana (meeting) and hālāwai (meeting)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

The creators of these lessons would be able to answer this best, since I have never really heard this used. I would think based upon a possible context that hālāwai (meeting) is a planned meeting, but hui ‘ana (meeting) is unplanned or informal, as if you meet up with someone or perhaps you run into the person somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luscinda

If that is so, the given translation can't be right - in English one does not thank someone for the meeting if a meeting was not arranged. Is this actually 'it was nice to see you'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

‘Ae, I think that is what they were trying to say, maybe something like "It's so nice to run into (hui) you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MitchTalmadge

Today the answer is "good seeing you" so I believe you are both right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/remington44

so I don't understand why it can't mean: "Good meeting you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikiasays

Why can't this mean good meeting you if hui'ana means meeting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I posted this in reply to another user, but I'll copy it here too:

I've been undecided about including that specific phrase, because I don't want people to have the impression that this is only used when meeting someone for the first time. In my personal experience of modern-day English, I hear people say "good meeting you" only when they have just met someone for the first time. Perhaps others might have a different experience.

I had previously accepted several other variations though, for example, "I appreciate our meeting". So, I have decided that I will add "good meeting you" as well, because in the broad meaning of the word "meeting" (any instance of meeting, and not just the first time) it is certainly correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathWizard7

Just one question out of curiosity. Is the speech computer generated or a human recorded voice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Some Duolingo courses have computer generated voices, but in our course you are hearing the voices of real people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JArgeles

So the literal translation for this is "Thank you for the meeting?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyRose232636

Mahalo=Thanks . ka=the, hui=group/gathering, ʻana -a grammatical marker. Thanks the meeting. Hawaiian often doesnʻt translate well into English. The idea is there though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

The literal translation is "I appreciate the meeting."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguista420

What is the meaning of “ka”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KitCat1000

Why is the word '49ers' an option?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Assuming that's a serious question, there are some really stupid choices (like Bob Marley and whatever) sprinkled in here, much to MY annoyance (and others' I assume) - not very professional, IMHO....

I thought I remembered reading somewhere that those "solutions" were added by some hacker, but I don't know how that could be...? Anyway, I haven't seen many lately, so maybe they're being weeded out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

They haven't been added by a hacker! :) They are actually words picked semi-randomly by Duolingo from other parts of the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeuilaNaon

Thanks for the comments to help clarify


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BamboozleB

wtf I wrote it's good seeing you, but it's wrooooong??????? Wtf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hawaiian-is-hard

Same! It said meeting and seeing are the same but then it told me i was wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

I am not sure why it offers the option to use "see" or "seeing" and then marks it wrong. Please report that. The word hui means to meet or gather in a group. It can be loosely used to say It is good seeing you, ie it is good meeting or running into each other = Mahalo ka hui ‘ana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura372669

I don't get why it says this, because isent mahalo "Thanks"? Than why does it say "good"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

This is an obscure saying used only by a small very restricted segment of the Hawaiian speaking population. This is an example of the difference between an exact translation and a situational or conceptual translation.

An exact translation would be a simple, descriptive sentence for example. "The man left." That could be translated exactly.

Since this is a greeting, one that not really anyone in the general population has heard before, we have to go on a situational translation. When an English speaker says "It's good to see you!", how would this small, very restricted population of Hawaiian speakers express that same thing in a similar situation? They would say apparently (we have to take the writers' word for it since so few have contact with this population), "Mahalo ka hui ‘ana."

The exact translation of it is "The meeting is appreciated." (mahalo = appreciated). It is like translating the French "Bonjour!" as "Hello!" even though you are literally saying in French "Good day!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Mahalo e kelii, for that explanation of the way this phrase is translated. Hopefully it will help folks understand a little better.

Just wanted to make a note that these kinds of phrases (like "Mahalo ka hui ʻana" and "Mahalo kēia hui ʻana") are not only used by folks from Niʻihau. These kinds of phrases (including others like "Hauʻoli kēia hui ʻana") can also be heard in recordings of native speakers from other islands, for example, in recordings of the radio show Ka Leo Hawaiʻi.

I mentioned Niʻihau folks specifically though, because they are a population of native speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hawaiian-is-hard

Someone please help me I'm trying to learn hawaiian but I don't understand the sentence structure!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

It is a Verb Subject Object structure for the most part, even when there is no verb. If there is no verb, then the first part serves usually as a predicate, a part two of sorts for the English sentence. You need to start learning to identify where these three parts (VSO) start and end. Then, you can start playing with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Squishy16023

Hey!! Wow!! Do we have to memorise this right away!? I just started last week!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kekahimoku

If hui 'ana is defined as "meeting" by duolingo why is "good meeting you" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I've been undecided about including that specific phrase, because I don't want people to have the impression that this is only used when meeting someone for the first time. In my personal experience of modern-day English, I hear people say "good meeting you" only when they have just met someone for the first time. Perhaps others might have a different experience.

I had previously accepted several other variations though, for example, "I appreciate our meeting". So, I have decided that I will add "good meeting you" as well, because in the broad meaning of the word "meeting" (any instance of meeting, and not just the first time) it is certainly correct!

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