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"El niño sacó su bicicleta."

Translation:The boy took his bicycle out.

5 years ago

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tac730

"the boy took his bicycle" should have been accepted. took was one of the choices when you hover over the definitions.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

You're right that the hover text is incorrect, however I think that sacar usually means "take out," whereas llevar or tomar can translate to "take." At my work, I use sacar to tell the cook to take food out of the oven, or to tell him to take food off of the grill.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrslunnpoly

thanks - that makes sense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LewisH65
LewisH65
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But in this context, we would usually phrase this as just 'take' in English rather than 'take out'. It'd be pretty rare that one would 'take' a bicycle without the 'out' being implied.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Not if you're taking your bike out of a garage. Or taking it out of the back of a truck. Or out of the house.

To take something OUT is not the same thing as taking it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcusTurner
MarcusTurner
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Couldn't "niño" also be "kid"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Absolutely. Or “child”.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbsmd
dbsmd
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Why is this 'took out' and not 'took'? 'The kid took his bicycle' sounds better to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jay9909

They don´t mean the same thing. "He took his bike out of the garage" vs "He took his bike to school." The first means to remove something from its current location and the second means to bring it with you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

Oh, I figured it mean "took" as in stole. Can it not mean this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

Not a native speaker, but I think not. I believe that the meaning of "took" as in "stole" is colloquial to English. Robar means to steal, and sacar translates to "take out" or "take off" etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Took could mean that but sacar doesn't. So took out is a better translation to avoid any ambiguity.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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good explanation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘sacar’ means “to remove”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Don't "took" and "took out" both mean "removed"? E.g. The bike was under the tree and he took the bike; he didn't take it out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Yes, removed (from) could be a synonym for both. It has a more general meaning in this case, though, than took and took out. I think we're starting to get more specific in our translations now, which is good. I'd use took out when the object was inside something, such as a garage, a box, a yard, a room.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredSmith666

You should make up your own language and vocabulary....ya'll keep insisting things i.e. words are what you say they are. They gave you a definition. Use it. Use a dictionary.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

No, take out and take do not mean the same thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

The verb for take is "tomar" To take out is "sacar"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boricua022708

Sacar has a few different meanings and the word 'took' in English has many different Spanish words as well =) http://spanish.about.com/od/translationsfromenglish/a/to_take.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pmjenkinson

In the hover over hint, it says "to take out"; like "buscar" isn't "to look" but "to look for."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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'Sounds better to me' is not really the strongest criterion when translating to my mind tho definitely to be kept in mind - like does this not really sound like English? "Take out" something - very reasonable expression....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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I would like to know if it is also correct to say -

"The boy took out his bicycle"

and if it is mean exactly the same as the sentence above.

(I'm not a native English speaker).

Thanks in advance

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

itay_bi: Yes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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Thanks a lot Rickydito! ...and you can call me just 'Itay', that's enough. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanLibera1

I agree that "The boy took out his bicycle" means the same thing, but if you wanted to specify that he took the bicycle out of the garage, it would have to be, "The boy took his bicycle out of the garage."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrynelson

The hint also says simply 'took' so why not accept ' he took his/her bike

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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The boy took his bicycle is correct. I reported it to DL 01/18/2014. They can't add it if we don't report/complain through the proper channel.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil65

"The boy took its bicycle out" is one of the correct answers? That sentence is nonsensical in every possible interpretation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Imagine a science fiction story in which a robot or other sexless alien being left its bicycle…

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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jejeje

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isaacrombie

Can "sacó" (take out) also mean killing someone? Like in English, when a soldier says, "Don't worry, I took him out" it means he killed him. Does that work in Spanish or no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rochelle74165

"The boy removed his bike" is that correct also?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/audreyrku

The boy took his bicycle out to the prom.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranong71

Removed should have been accepted. T__T

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Since when does sacar mean “PULL out”?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Andrea: That is used when referring to teeth. The dentist pulled the tooth out = El dentista sacó el diente. reference GRAN DICCIONARIO OXFORD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Okay, thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepe0001

I entered 'The boy took out his bycicle' and got marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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I entered "The boy took out his bicycle." and it was correct. Check the spelling of bicycle.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pepe0001

lol - that was my problem... :-P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrThunder88

I am confused too. Does "sacar fotos" therefore mean "to take OUT photos"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No, "to take photos" is a special expression in both languages and is expressed as "sacar fotos". http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/sacar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thvnoort
thvnoort
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I'm down to my last three questions, two hearts remaining. Question 1 is 'El niño sacó su bicicleta' which I translate as 'the boy took his bicycle'. I lose a heart, because apparently I need to add 'out'. Question 2: 'la niña sacó un cuchillo', which I translate as 'the girl took a knife out'. Makes sense, right? Nope, I lose a heart because apparently the 'out' was too much. Now I'm a bit puzzled, what is it? With out or without? Last question is again 'El niño sacó su bicicleta'. So of course I translate this to 'the boy took his bicycle', because the girl needed no out, so why should the boy? But again I lose a heart, and with that I can redo the entire lesson.

So here's a honest and heartfelt PISS OFF! I'm out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

They might have counted you wrong for the "la niña cacó un cuchillo" because of where you placed the "out" - "the girl took out a knife" vs "the girl took a knife out" - the computer database of correct answers only has certain varations.

Sacar = to take out (to take an object out of another thing - taking a bicycle out of a garage, taking a credit card out of a wallet)

Tomar = to take (general taking, also to "take tea" or "take lunch" - to eat/drink)

Llevar = to take (as in to carry something to somewhere, or to give a ride to someone)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tobibeer
tobibeer
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the problem with not being able to just translate it as "took" is that — even if you were to remove something from somewhere — you're not always taking someting OUT of something, because it wasn't inside anything to begin with

basically, "to take" can mean to take out, to take away ...everything else is being pious ...otherwise chose a more precise example, like "from the garage".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mujeranciana

The distinction between "take" and "take out" with regard to a bicycle (or car) is specious. "Take out" implies "to remove from" and since the sentence does not specify any "from", it is reasonable to assume that "take" (as in got on and rode or simply appropriated) is correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kayllama

Riding down, riding down, my hand on your seat the whole way 'round...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IdeanBehfo
IdeanBehfo
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Can sacar also be used as a euphemism for when hitmen take out a target?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alRSBu

57 times saying this and will not let me pass

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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how do you express in Spanish the boy taking his own bicycle out as opposed to taking someone else's bicycle out (when using the pronoun "su"? I was thinking "se sucó" but that doesn't seem right.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrolamberto863

We are translating into English. The English "took" is more common than "took (noun) out."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

The "correct" answer is wrong in the audio mode. "You used the wrong word. The boy pulled out his bicycle.." Moreover, the "correct" answer does not conform with Duo's hint. I have reported it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joekal
joekal
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Sacó se puede traducido como ¨grabbed¨´

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walbergb

if the translation is sacó = took out, then why is the translation I'm given read "He pulled his bike."? I checked with the dictioary and there is no translation for sacar that is even close to "pull"!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanda6404
Amanda6404
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Duolingo love to repeat sentences don't they?! Not that I really mind as its all in good practice but when you see the same sentences three times... slightly annoying.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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It's likely deliberate. I tutor English for speakers of other languages, and one of the things that is emphasized in our training is that repetition is critical.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelvinFost1

"The child took out their bicycle" is what the solution now reads. That is ugly English, and how does "su" become "their"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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"Su" is the possessive short form adjective that goes with all singular third person cases as well as the formal singular second person. "So it can mean his, her, its, your (formal) or their.

Possessive adjectives http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100031/possessive-adjectives https://www.thoughtco.com/possessive-adjectives-short-form-3079109

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mockingbir102431

I keep getting the same phrases up to 4 times per lesson. Exactly the same. I get them right and then get them again and again. What is going on?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DustinHebe2

Got this sentence now 5 times.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telseth
telseth
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Why couldn't it be "The boy dried his bicycle." I wash and dry mine all the time...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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Sacó is a conjugation of the verb sacar which means "to take out, to remove". I believe you might be thinking of the "secar" that means "to dry". They're certainly similar enough to get mixed up.

Sacar http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/sacar

Secar http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/secar

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telseth
telseth
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Ah, duh. Thanks! I seem to have the most problems with verbs with single letter differences.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henry122426
Henry122426
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In UK English we would probably say he "took out his bicycle" rather than "took his bicycle out". Both are acceptable. The "out" part of the sentence would usually be more about something like "out for a ride" rather than "out of the shed". But it could be either.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert888667

ITS BIKE!!! What sort of a person is an IT???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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"Su" can be translated as his, her, or its car. Its shows as an option only because its a possible translation for the word not necessarily for the sentence. There are plenty of times when it makes perfect sense for possession even if this sentence isn't one of them. The car lost its exhaust pipe. The cat lost its toy. The circus bear fell off its bicycle.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joyceluna3

taking "out" sounds incorrect i guess because the rest of the sentence is not there///is :"out "a preposition?? never ending a sentence with one...?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marianne805142

In English it is bycicle and not bicycle

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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In English in the United States, it is bicycle.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/bicycle

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dianelane2
Dianelane2
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It is not excepting my correct answer......why?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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Several questions using the same sentence lead to this comment screen. So it is best if you copy and paste your answer and tell us what instructions you were given. Then we can all look at it and help you if you were wrong and confirm if you were right.

It's easy to think you were right without realizing you made a small mistake. I've done that a lot. For example, in your post here, you should have used the word "accepting" instead of "excepting". An easy mistake to make without noticing, especially if you are typing quickly.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

3 months ago