"Elniñosacósubicicleta."

Translation:The boy took his bicycle out.

5 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tac730

"the boy took his bicycle" should have been accepted. took was one of the choices when you hover over the definitions.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

You're right that the hover text is incorrect, however I think that sacar usually means "take out," whereas llevar or tomar can translate to "take." At my work, I use sacar to tell the cook to take food out of the oven, or to tell him to take food off of the grill.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrslunnpoly

thanks - that makes sense

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcusTurner
MarcusTurner
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Couldn't "niño" also be "kid"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Absolutely. Or “child”.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbsmd
dbsmd
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Why is this 'took out' and not 'took'? 'The kid took his bicycle' sounds better to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jay9909

They don´t mean the same thing. "He took his bike out of the garage" vs "He took his bike to school." The first means to remove something from its current location and the second means to bring it with you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

Oh, I figured it mean "took" as in stole. Can it not mean this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

Not a native speaker, but I think not. I believe that the meaning of "took" as in "stole" is colloquial to English. Robar means to steal, and sacar translates to "take out" or "take off" etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

The verb for take is "tomar" To take out is "sacar"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘sacar’ means “to remove”.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Don't "took" and "took out" both mean "removed"? E.g. The bike was under the tree and he took the bike; he didn't take it out.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Yes, removed (from) could be a synonym for both. It has a more general meaning in this case, though, than took and took out. I think we're starting to get more specific in our translations now, which is good. I'd use took out when the object was inside something, such as a garage, a box, a yard, a room.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

No, take out and take do not mean the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boricua022708

Sacar has a few different meanings and the word 'took' in English has many different Spanish words as well =) http://spanish.about.com/od/translationsfromenglish/a/to_take.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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'Sounds better to me' is not really the strongest criterion when translating to my mind tho definitely to be kept in mind - like does this not really sound like English? "Take out" something - very reasonable expression....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pmjenkinson

In the hover over hint, it says "to take out"; like "buscar" isn't "to look" but "to look for."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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I would like to know if it is also correct to say -

"The boy took out his bicycle"

and if it is mean exactly the same as the sentence above.

(I'm not a native English speaker).

Thanks in advance

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

itay_bi: Yes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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Thanks a lot Rickydito! ...and you can call me just 'Itay', that's enough. :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrynelson

The hint also says simply 'took' so why not accept ' he took his/her bike

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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The boy took his bicycle is correct. I reported it to DL 01/18/2014. They can't add it if we don't report/complain through the proper channel.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isaacrombie

Can "sacó" (take out) also mean killing someone? Like in English, when a soldier says, "Don't worry, I took him out" it means he killed him. Does that work in Spanish or no?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rochelle74165

"The boy removed his bike" is that correct also?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IdeanBehfo
IdeanBehfo
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Can sacar also be used as a euphemism for when hitmen take out a target?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Since when does sacar mean “PULL out”?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Andrea: That is used when referring to teeth. The dentist pulled the tooth out = El dentista sacó el diente. reference GRAN DICCIONARIO OXFORD

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Okay, thanks.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil65

"The boy took its bicycle out" is one of the correct answers? That sentence is nonsensical in every possible interpretation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Imagine a science fiction story in which a robot or other sexless alien being left its bicycle…

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrThunder88

I am confused too. Does "sacar fotos" therefore mean "to take OUT photos"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No, "to take photos" is a special expression in both languages and is expressed as "sacar fotos". http://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/sacar

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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how do you express in Spanish the boy taking his own bicycle out as opposed to taking someone else's bicycle out (when using the pronoun "su"? I was thinking "se sucó" but that doesn't seem right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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In real life, with context, it would probably be clear with this sentence whether you mean his own or someone else's.

If, for some reason, context wouldn't be clear, you would most likely restructure the sentence by adding a word or by avoiding su in favor of the "de" structure for possession.

El niño sacó su propia bicicleta. The boy took out his own bike.

El niño sacó la bicicleta de ella. The boy took out her bike.

El niño sacó la bicicleta de el otro niño. The boy took out the other boy's bike.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelvinFost1

"The child took out their bicycle" is what the solution now reads. That is ugly English, and how does "su" become "their"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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"Su" is the possessive short form adjective that goes with all singular third person cases as well as the formal singular second person. "So it can mean his, her, its, your (formal) or their.

Possessive adjectives http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100031/possessive-adjectives https://www.thoughtco.com/possessive-adjectives-short-form-3079109

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telseth
telseth
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Why couldn't it be "The boy dried his bicycle." I wash and dry mine all the time...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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Sacó is a conjugation of the verb sacar which means "to take out, to remove". I believe you might be thinking of the "secar" that means "to dry". They're certainly similar enough to get mixed up.

Sacar http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/sacar

Secar http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/secar

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telseth
telseth
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Ah, duh. Thanks! I seem to have the most problems with verbs with single letter differences.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/audreyrku

The boy took his bicycle out to the prom.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranong71

Removed should have been accepted. T__T

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane461570

What is wrong with - the boy got out his bicycle

1 month ago
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