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"Yo no te he obligado a comer."

Translation:I have not forced you to eat.

0
5 years ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ozespanol

it is correct in English to say" I have not obliged you to eat" Obligated is very American

35
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k-kayak

"I have not obliged you to eat" is correct English. But you would more likely here insisted or forced you to eat

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Obliged seems far less insistent to me than forced. So, "forced" seems to capture the meaning of the Spanish better.

0
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Yes it is, (correct to say obliged), but it's not accepted, so I've reported it - 31/7/14

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Yes.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naypam
Naypam
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Marked it as correct, I though it was just me in the wrong but that's the second time it's tripped me up!

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anastasia799350

It's not common usage, however. "Forced" would be more often used.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fotopala

I too wrote "I have not obliged you to eat" and was marked wrong, I think this is a correct English statement.

19
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

Likewise!

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roentgen89
Roentgen89
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"I have not obliged you to eat". Now accepted Dec 15. I somehow felt obligated to let you know(!)

7
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turgidtom

oblige implies the person still could refuse "he was obliged to act but didn't". when you use force there's no implied alternative, by using force you allude to the only outcome there can be. at least that's how i understand it :)

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

On first glance, forgetting I needed have/had in the sentence in this section, I thought it translated:

I am not obligated to eat you.

Sounded like a typical DL sentence ... :)

17
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottsep
scottsep
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it looks like the English word 'oblige', but it's easiest to think of it as meaning 'to force' or 'to make', as in 'I didn't force you to eat/I didn't make you eat.'

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danom0n

Why is the 'a' needed between obligado and comer? Doesn't the infinitive comer already mean 'to eat'?

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Some Spanish verbs need a preposition before the infinitive. It's just the way Spanish is.

This useful site lists some verbs that have a preposition before the following infinitive. http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/VRBSPREP.HTM. It doesn't have obligar, but other dictionaries show "obligar a" in the examples.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jshaw1961

they need to review this one

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/healthnut

I am not obliged to feed you .. Is that not correct??

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No. "Yo" is not the one being obliged, "yo" is the one doing the obliging (or forcing). (Besides the past tense thing ...)

Yo no te ha-obligado a comer.
I not to-you have-obliged to eat.
...
I not have-obliged you to eat
...
I have not obliged you to eat

I think "I am not obliged to feed you" would be "Yo no estoy obligado a te alimentar".

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Or better, "a alimentarte".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Thanks. I haven't seen many examples of attaching the pronoun to the verb like that in DL so I don't have any idea how to use that type of construction. Is it always better to do it that way?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Hola Barbara, In the sentence you wrote above, alimentarte is the only way to write it. But it means "I am not obliged to feed you, not I have not obliged you to eat. Look closely at who is being obliged. If you put the te before the verb, as you have seen so far in DL, it must be before the main verb, so "Yo no te estoy obligado a alimentar". But this says something totally diffferent from what you wrote, but is a correct translation of the English: " I am not obliged to feed you. It depends on who is being obliged, me to feed you, or you to eat. Clear as mud?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes, thanks, that's clear as clear :) Except I don't understand what you said about "This says something totally different from what you wrote." My last sentence was an attempt to translate "I am not obliged to feed you", not the actual sentence in this DL question. I was trying to answer healthnut's question.

2
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Hi Barbara, This is strange. DL does not offer me the reply button to your last message. I am hereby acknowledging your last reply ending with question. There were so many comments that I may have gotten mixed up as to which one I was responding to. :-)

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CraigBickley

Does my mother in law write for Duolingo?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtpetry

Pero tu estómago? Ese te obliga a comer.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cavman144
Cavman144
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yet...

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/royale1223

Doesn't 'a comer' become 'to to eat'?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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You can't translate word for word between the languages.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k-kayak

Obligar requires the"a"

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_ri
Dan_ri
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'Obliged' is more personal, I think. Rules obligate, people oblige.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertaRfr

There is nothing wrong with "obliged". Check out Longman's Dictionary.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Of course obliged is correct. Do Duolingo staff read these comments?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, these sentence discussions are only for us students. To talk to Duolingo, you have to report the problem (using the Report button on the main page of the sentence).

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/38JoeyPitPirates
38JoeyPitPirates
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The "he" is also confusing because the h is silent

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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If they are not going to put the correct translation in the pull down menu why do they even bother with it. How are we supposed to know that obliged can mean forced.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Youpapa

So how do we say "I have not obligated to eat you" That's what I wrote......I thought Duolingo gave me another nonsense sentence again...but I was wrong

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Youpapa: Your example sentence "I have not obligated to eat you" wouldn't make sense in English because when you 'obligate' there needs to be someone whom you are obligating (or 'have obligated', in your case). It's like saying "I have not told to punch you" - you have (not) told whom? No one.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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If you mean how would you say "I have not been obligated to eat you", that would be "No he sido obligado a comerte".

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Huh? That makes no sense whatsoever!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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Do not have??

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LearnSpanish2222

Pronunciation question for obligado: what is the difference in sound between he obligado and ha obligado when one is speaking fast and liaising the words? Is the "o" dominant in both so they sound the same or is there a difference?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronJimen20

I notice this sentence uses the passive verb 'haber' meaning have. Is this verb necessary? Instead of "I have not forced.." what would be "I didn't force.."? Thanks.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

No te obligué a comer = I didn't force you to eat.

2
Reply2 years ago