"My finger is smaller than your finger."

Translation:मेरी उँगली तुम्हारी उँगली से छोटी है ।

November 25, 2018

11 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kookkannan

Is 'तुमहारी उगंली से मेरी उगंली छोटी है' wrong grammatically?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92

No. It justs emphasises a different part of the sentence. You can report if it's not accepted. (Note that you've made a typo in spelling उंगली)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BNR7

why is it tumhari not teri


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xeeeeeeeee

Both are valid in this case. Possessive: Tu -> teri Tum -> tumhari Aap -> aapko


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/studiodesigner

Why "sai" instead of"may"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gita-ji

Translation for than is से (sē) rather than में ("may") which means in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanu2122006

Maybe jiminous fingers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrei_5g

Shouldn't it be उँगलियाँ instead of उँगली because of से? This makes me a little confused. I will come back to this lesson in case someone reply to my message. Thank you in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92

No. The singular oblique-case form (which you have to use because of the postposition से) is not always the same as the plural form. That only happens in the case of masculine nouns.
The forms of उँगली are:
Singular - उँगली (Eg: मेरी उँगली छोटी है - My finger is small)
Singular oblique - उँगली (यह गाजर मेरी उँगली से बड़ी है - This carrot is bigger than my finger)
Plural - उँगलियाँ ( मेरी उँगलियाँ छोटी हैं - My fingers are small)
Plural oblique - उँगलियों (यह गाजर मेरी सभी उँगलियों से बड़ी है - This carrot is bigger than all my fingers)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwallpolin

why तुम्हारी and not तुम्हार? I'm still trying to understand the case system but since that is the object of the sentence I was expecting the plural to be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92

तुम्हारी is used because उँगली is feminine.
You must use तुम्हारी when it is followed by any feminine noun (singular or plural, direct or oblique).

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