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  5. "Where are my green shoes?"

"Where are my green shoes?"

Translation:Wo sind meine grünen Schuhe?

April 4, 2013

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaMDe

This is crazy! I have the feeling I'll never manage these endings...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACardAttack

You will get there, I'm finally starting to get there, this site helped me a lot http://www.apronus.com/learngerman/adj.htm

Remember Rome wasn't built in a day and language is a life time of learning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lajahas

It's beautiful!! And to think i was about to hit 'translate page'..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karlesp

It IS super hard, but it gets easier. You'll get there!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seamusrowan

Right there with ya. At this point, the only thing that keeps me going is sheer stubborness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peteyfas

This vid really helped simplify things for me. Still not 100% comftorable but at least its no longer a mystery.

youtube.com/watch?v=UgRDUCnH2Ps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gettinlate

Thanks for sharing the link. That really is helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerillamarketing

Do I understand correctly?

We are in nominative plural. "Meine" is a "definite article-like word" therefore it has the -e ending. "Grünen" is an "adjective after definite article" therefore it has the -en ending.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabriele.tscha

I thought in the nominative it should be "grüne". In dative it would be "grünen". Is it because of "Wo?" Because the answer would require a preposition with dative... Or is it accusative? I'm very confused...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koyunlar

MAybe I just missed this before:

Do the adjectives always take the ending "-en" in the nominative case of plural "die"?

In this sentence "my green shoes" are nominative. I did not know that adjectives have to have the ending "-en" in the nominative case....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4of92000

Thanks. The link is handy. However, could somebody please write a summary of what the rules are in this case? Wikipedia, while handy, can be really dense.

Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4of92000

Thanks. That clarifies everything.

Some summary pseudocode (Python-like):

<pre>def weak_declension(case, number): if case == nominative and number == singular: suffix = "e" else: suffix = "en" </pre>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stuart_Cook

Good pseudo code, but for the wrong situation. This situation calls for mixed inflection because of the possessive determiner preceding the adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nivishsharma

Wish everyone explained in codes...I can understand far better this way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreOlin

Das ist tolle Seite


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert87543

In answer to '4of92000':

When words go BEFORE a noun, German always tries to show the gender (F,M,N, PL) and case (Subject, Object, Dative). Endings that show gender and case are called STRONG endings.

If TWO words go before a noun, only ONE of them needs a STRONG ending! The other gets a WEAK ending.

Thus D-er gut-e Mann

= STRONG WEAK

But Ein gut-er Mann

= WEAK STRONG

I like using the tables below, which I memorise, although I know they won’t help everyone

==============

1) STRONG endings: for ‘der’ words (plus dieser welcher etc when -as endings become -es)

......….F.....M.....N.....PL

SUB die der das die

OBJ die den das die


DAT der dem dem den

==============

2) MIXED endings: for ‘ein‘ words (kein, mein, ihr etc):

:WEAK for top 2 rows BUT

:STRONG for DATIVE row + STRONG for PLURAL column

......….F.....M.....N.....PL

SUB eine ein ein keine

OBJ eine einen ein keine


DT einer einem einem keinen

==============

3) STRONG ADJECTIVE endings mimic ‘der’ endings

…….…F....M....N.....PL

SUB -e -er -es -e

OBJ -e -en -es -e


DAT -er -em -em -en

==============

4) WEAK ADJECTIVE endings

…….…F...M...N....PL

SUB -e -e -e -en

OBJ -e -en -e -en


DAT -en -en -en -en

==============

Use table 1) or 2) for the 'der’ word or ‘ein’ word.

Then use table 3) or 4) to make the second word strong or weak accordingly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koyunlar

Thank you so much Hohenems!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

No problem. I suggest bookmarking the page since it will answer a lot of questions down the road.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sagher

"My green shoes" is accusative here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uglycheif

After sein ("to be") things stay in the nominative. I don't remember the rule or reason why but it simplifies things.

These adjectives with their mixed declension, though....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert87543

In reply to 'uglycheif'

Sein (to be) is like an '=' sign, so whatever comes after it is still the subject. I think of it like this:

John is a doctor

John = a doctor

Subject = Subject

Nominative = Nominative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chocolateriem

No, it is nominative like koyunlar wrote earlier. The phrase "My green shoes" is the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plm_cr

I just asume that plural adjectives always takes the ending "en" unless it has a definite article. It's simpler that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Adjectives for plurals always take -en unless there's no article (then they take -e).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/armeezy

    Why not grune??? Is it dative? Then Why???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      It's not dative - it's nominative.

      There's not really a 'reason why', but try reading my interpretation of the logic here. Going by that, we need grünen because the 'plural nominative signal' -e has already been shown by meine, but that signal uses -e for something other than a 'normal situation', so the adjective needs -en.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andromeda.383

      Why isn't it "grüne" since schuh is in plural form (die) ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shelomith.

      Is this in the dative form? I'm so confused!!! If so why?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktgaston

      Perspective: It's fun to geek out on grammar, but people will still understand you if you get adjective endings incorrect!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob20020

      I feel like I have just been deserted from all civilization with these endings. Why do people say english is the hardest?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deadpool723

      Please somebody tell me what this means. I love learning German but this gramatic stuff is rather confusing me :-(. Why Grunen in this sentence.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

      http://www.apronus.com/learngerman/adj.htm

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_adjectives#Weak_and_strong_inflection

      • Mixed inflection because of 'mein-'
      • plural because 'my shoes'
      • fortunately all endings in the table are '-en', so it has to be '-en'. ;) (nominative)
      • --> Wo sind meine grünen Schuhe.

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nialo

      Whats wrong with Wohin sind meine grünen Schuhe? Should it be Wohin meine grünen Schuhe?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john1618

      That would be "Where to are my green shoes"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soufi81

      Why not: wo sind meinen grünen Schuhe??


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

      http://www.apronus.com/learngerman/adj.htm

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_adjectives#Weak_and_strong_inflection

      • Mixed inflection because of 'mein-'
      • plural because 'my shoes'
      • happyly all endings in the table are '-en', so it has to be '-en'. ;)
      • --> Wo sind meine grünen Schuhe.

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Araz944

      Why not "grüne"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharityGloria

      I wrote ," Wo sind meine grün schuhe" what is wrong with my answer?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reconnoisance

      Because mein the possesive pronoum takes the Mixed inflection and the verb sein(sind) takes the Nominative case and the Noun is plural(Schuhe) Then will be Mixed inflection+Plural+Nominative Case=Ending adjective=en grün becomes grünen


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michelle_Wruck

      wha?!?!? Thanks for the explanation but WTF German?!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldMansChild

      Using 'markers' than word order to clarify things introduces overhead to memory footprint. Germans must have very large RAM.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynder360

      Would "Wo sind meine gruenen Schuhe hin" be correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevoort

      "Hin" is only added when you are asking to where something is going. You wouldn't use "wohin" to ask where something is located. In English we use the same word for both meanings, but German differentiates.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikali157

      Everyone is kind and generous with their explanations, and, allegedly, there is a rational explanation for why it's grünen. But, from here, it's just another random anomaly to memorize for this phrase alone.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevoort

      This is an example of "mixed inflection." I studied four years of university-level German and was never taught there was such a thing as "strong, weak and mixed" inflection. They just always give you the same table, as if it's the answer to all your problems. Then life (or Duolingo) happens!

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