"The cats are drinking tea."

Translation:Les chats boivent du thé.

April 4, 2013

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pelusteriano

Let me guess, this are brit cats

June 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demeno

*these

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DLRags

"Stiff upper lip is key."

May 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/votears

no they are too shy to open their mouth

July 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lokaltmonster

Just chilling, drinking some tea with my cats.

August 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barracudamoo

AristoCATS!

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Eskan

classy cats, drinking earl gray

October 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onewoman365

That is some unusual cat behavior :)

April 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreamilybeamily

I don't remember using/seeing the feminine versions of cats/dogs when I was at school and when I've read French since. Are they commonly used or do people default to the masculine?

July 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

We usually default to the masculine indeed.

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danii.kun

After wine, now French cats drink tea? So classy. (_)

July 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poxto

What is the difference between du and le?

April 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"le" and "un" are not interchangeable. In both English and French languages, their use is defined by rules which are not always similar.

o DEFINITE ARTICLE "the" => le, la, les.

As their name explicits, they define nouns: the meal = le repas, is a specific meal, not any meal. Often, when you get longer sentences of a full text, you get hints by context. - ex: the woman eats THE meal that the cook prepared = la femme mange LE repas que le chef a préparé.

Note1: in English, when you claim a generality, like "men are stronger than women", the French use the definite article: "LES hommes sont plus forts que LES femmes".

o PARTITIVE ARTICLE => de la, du

When the object (what you drink or eat, for example) is not countable (countable:one strawberry, two strawberries), the French use DE+ definite article as a partitive expression. That is the case with water, milk, wine, bread, soup... of which you drink or eat only "some" of it, a part of it, a portion of it.

  • ex: when you get "cats are drinking tea", it means that they are drinking a certain quantity or tea: "some tea". So the translation will be "du thé", where "de" is a contraction of de-le.

  • cats are drinking soup = les chats boivent de la soupe (feminine noun)

April 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yxxc68

Thanks for the clear explanation.

April 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poxto

Merci beaucoup! That helps a lot!

April 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorebenavent

Very clear. Thanks so much

September 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oderi

You made me realize it would probably be easier to study French in Finnish since we have a bazillion different forms for nouns, including partitive ("le pain" = "leipä", "du pain = leipää").

April 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evilmoon11

Merci. Move here and teach me French.

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZEXALII

"le" is the and "un" is a or an.

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janstier

The bread= le pain Bread= du pain the tomatoes = les tomates Tomatoes= Des tomates

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZEXALII

ha! imagine cats drinking out of mugs!

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melanie.st3

I'm slightly confused. In previous sentences that used "chatte" it would only accept "female cat" as the answer.

So why is "les chattes" not "female cats"?

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whitepearl14

I read through the post and I don' understand either why the answer is not "The FEMALE cats are drinking tea".

December 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

There is no indication that these cats are females.

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeepanshuSharma

Les Chats boivent thé ..

August 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prathameshk127

Why and when is du used??

October 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jodigs6

du the, why not le the

July 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

because the English version is "tea" meaning "some tea". please read the second post on this thread.

July 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daniellindhaga

Can you really say "des chattes" for cats (plural)?

October 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Would you please clarify your question?

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madfootALK

yes, if it's a group of female cats.

August 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yugemonz

Can someone explain to me why it's "les chattes" instead of "les chats"? le chat is masculine.

November 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"the cats" can be males or females.

in French, since we there are separate words for male and female, it is indeed possible that "the cats" are females, so "les chattes".

November 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dvferrero7

The correct answer is "les petites chattes" instead of 'les petits chats' because of the pronunciation used by the talking lady. These phrases DO NOT sound the same; they sound different from each other. If you listen closely, she pronounces the last T at the end of 'petites' and at the end of 'chattes.'

November 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nadjalench2011

"les chattes or "les chats"?

December 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/french_learn1

"Les chattes" is for female cats and "les chats" is for male cats

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rawben

Difference between des and du/de?

February 5, 2015
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.