https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

Hare vs Rabbit dun dun dun...

Usagiboy7
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Image description: Darth Vader in a field. A hare stands to the right, look up at him. Text: "Do not fear, your father is hare."
Image source w/out text, source with text

What's the difference between a rabbit and a hare?
Are they different animals, or just different words?

Hare is the oldest name for these furry animals—it’s a word as old as English itself. Though hare is sometimes used interchangeably with rabbit, there are differences that involve both biology and terminology.

Hare derives ultimately from the Old English word for “gray.” Rabbit entered the language from French in the 14th century. Though originally classified as rodents, both are now part of the order called lagomorphsplay (from the Greek words meaning “hare” and “form”), which differ from rodents by having two rows of upper incisors and by being herbivorous. Hares are distinguished from rabbits by their larger size, longer ears, and longer hind legs. They also tend to live alone or in pairs in above-ground nests, whereas rabbits often live together in groups of up to 20 in underground tunnels known as warrens.

Another important difference between hares and rabbits is the way their young are born: hares are born covered in fur and with open eyes, but rabbits are born furless, blind, and helpless.

The fact that they can be difficult to tell apart is also reflected in particular names: a jackrabbit is really a hare, but a swamp hare is really a rabbit. Coney is sometimes used to refer to an adult rabbit, and the terms buck, doe, and kitten or kit (for male, female, and young rabbits, respectively), though correct, are much more closely associated with other mammals.
source

Picture of a rabbit and a hare side by side

1 week ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

Reminds me of a post by a handsome gentleman, about how people use turtle when refering to both turtles and tortoises. Madness, right?

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/26988057/Turtle-vs-Tortoise-Different-animals-or-interchangeable

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yves88541

I'm surprised about this stuff, because my preschooler knows a tortoise from a turtle and a hare from a rabbit - and animals seem to be the major theme of his education these days. So people must just forget it after a while...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
MissSpells
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https://www.duolingo.com/C_R_A_Z-Y1273

Why thank you, Usagiboy7, for this nice educational post! Here's a lingot each to feed both the rabbit, and hare for all their hard work in helping you with this post. XD

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Aww, thank you C_R_A_Z-Y1273!

I knew there was a difference between the two, but wasn't quite sure what it was. So, I went on a search and thought it'd be fun to bring y'all along in case anyone else was curious. ^_^

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/C_R_A_Z-Y1273

No problem! :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meital640
Meital640
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In spanish. Rabbit=Conejo Hare=Liebre

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VballGurl9

Thanks for info, knew hare was bigger but that was about it. :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I remembered them having larger ears. But, that was about it. And, even that I would't solid on before I did some reading. :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VballGurl9

Haha yeah, def good to know. Cause they're actually pretty different. And thanks to whoever gave me a lingot ;)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yves88541

Lovely. And for me leveret hits a sweet spot in English, with just the right blend of velvety French softness and Germanic bony edges.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I love that description. Do you have synesthesia, by chance?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yves88541

I don't, but it's interesting how the animal's name has a different image in different languages. For lièvre I see the springy creature, lolloping along. For hare I see the animal stood bolt upright in a field, its big ears twitching. Zajíc seems to be running round in a mad zig-zag across the meadow :-) Do you see it differently in your languages?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Hmm... I really think you have synesthesia. There are a lot of types. I encourage you to look into whether you might have it. Letters with characters/personalities/temperments(etc) and textures are present in at least two types of synesthesia and a person can have more than one type.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yves88541

I just thought I was a bit poetic, but maybe that's the same thing :-) I'll look into it, thanks!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tranklements
Tranklements
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To what extent, I wonder, does synesthesia help with language learning. I was recently amazed to learn that most other members of my family do not "see" music. I had assumed that everyone had this experience. How boring it must be not to have colors and shapes accompanying the sounds. Perhaps the extra linkages I make which give letters and words personalities provide an advantage in learning languages. Are there any interesting studies on this? I found this article, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3938117/
and while I doubt the hypothesis that synesthesia is learnt - it seems very innate to the way my brain functions - the article contains some interesting references.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I dont have the article link handy, but there is also the theory that some synesthesia is learned and some innate. But, the distinction doesnt matter much to me. Depth perception is learned too.

My seses do their thing without any conscious effort on my part. Im fascinated that people don't experience the world the way I do more than whether someone unconsciously learned to experience things the way I do.

Some people can watch another person touch something and not feel it. They go to an action movie and never feel the ghost of a single injury.

When they watch a gif there are no sound effects, there are no sussurations during an ASL conversations.

Their numbers and letters are only in the font color theyre written in. How do they do math in their heads if their numbers have no colors automatically, no blue 3s or orange 2s? Do they have to select a color to imagine first and then they can picture the numbers?

My friend Jeff has aphantasia. He doesnt think in pictures at all which boggles my mind even more than that people dont feel the texture of sounds or experience brightness based on high/low pitch, and hints of color. What exactly do people get out of listening to music then? What is sound to them?? And how the heck does Jeff think without pictures??

That people can move through the world without the texture of every surface they view registering on their hands and tongue, do they just live in a smooth world constantly? (Not that I wouldnt forgoe tasting textures. I would personally like to evict parkinglots from my mouth.)

There was more stuff that I thought was odd about other people. But, I can't recall what they are right now. :P

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
MissSpells
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Thanks! I always enjoy these types of discussions for some reason. I had never known the difference before. Do you happen to know what is the group name for a group of rabbits, or a group of hares (like school, covey, flock)? Also, is a bunny just a baby rabbit..what is a baby hare?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/npLam
npLam
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baby hare?

leveret : )

for me, bunny is any rabbit, wild, pet, baby or adult. ( but not a hare)

a baby rabbit is a kit or kitten

in German, they seem to have two words for hare: Hase and Feldhase... which i take to mean hare and field hare... which makes me wonder where else would a hare live if not in a field? I tried looking up Haushase, but that seems not to exist :(

do you know the difference between a crow and a rook?

a rook on its own is a crow and a crow in a crowd is a rook...

but i can never remember whether it's that, or: a crow on its own is a rook and a rook in a crowd is a crow...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davey944676

A rook is just a different member of the crow family, I think, npLam. Usually anyway - maybe it's something regional, too?

A group of crows is called "a MURDER of crows". (Mwa Ha Ha!!)

They always did tend to get a bad press - harbingers of doom and witch's familiars and all that - probably because they really are "spookily" clever and bold.

I live in the 21st century, but I can easily imagine being disconcerted by that strange, evaluating, intelligent calm a crow can watch you with sometimes....... (cue Chanting Exorcist-type music.... :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/npLam
npLam
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: )

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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This made me think of the connection between the popular, Halloween conception of witches, was connected to alewives--women who brewed beer hundreds of years ago. (Instead of a crow though, it was a cat. The type of animal has undergone a lot of expansion over the years. You can check out the story here.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
MissSpells
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Thanks!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/furrier2

I believe rooks are larger than crows. They are even larger than ravens, if I recall correctly.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7RmZbvr0
7RmZbvr0
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There is "Stallhase" as a word for "domestic rabbit".

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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7RmZbvr0, I've never heard of that. When I look it up, the term "European rabbit" and all of the results lead me to English/German translation websites and a German wikipedia page. So, I'm thinking it is not a common term in the US and might not even be an English word. It's really exciting to come across new terms! :)

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire_Archer

I never knew there was a difference. Thanks for the cool post! :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/furrier2

If you cook them in a stew, they never last until the next day. Indeed, they are "hare today, gone tomorrow". :).

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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lol

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wingardium12

what's mobile?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryMcRabbit
MaryMcRabbit
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Ich liebe kaninchen und hasen! my German friend seems to use Hasen for rabbits as well... which I find quite confusing. Did you know that there are 3 animals in the lagomorph family. The third member of the family being the delightful pika. I find myself very drawn to this family of animals for some reason. Pikas look especially cute when they have mouths full of grass. They try and hide it under rocks so they have hay to eat in the winter. But sometimes other mountain goats or pikas steal it. Ich essen nicht Tiere wier Ich liebe alle von ihnen.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryMcRabbit
MaryMcRabbit
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oh I dont know how you do pictures...

6 days ago
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