"ʻO ka manakō koʻu makemake."

Translation:The mango is what I want.

December 1, 2018

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danylo65

Could this mean I want the mango?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IchhasseMuecken

It means that, but "The mango is what I want" is more literal because the mango is the subject in the sentence due to the subject particle 'o, as far as I understand.


[deactivated user]

    Yes. DL accepts that answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kalea7654

    Except it doesn't with me lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kagamiin

    "I desire mango" is what I wrote, but it was counted as wrong. Isn't that the exact same as saying "the mango is what I want"? Or am I not understanding this one?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalacticKe

    I don't understand how this is parsed. I thought "ʻo" was only used for "ia" and proper nouns? Why is this not something more like "He koʻu makemake ka manakō"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danylo65

    This is what Iʻm getting from it. Please correct me if Iʻm wrong I donʻt speak Hawaiian.

    ʻO is used to introduce the third person (he/she) so naturally manakō would count (he/she are used to replace objects and people and uname them for lack of a better term). So then we get "ʻo manakō".

    The next part, Iʻm unsure of but Iʻm going off Irish here as it seems to work weirdly similar to Hawaiian in a lot of ways. So, in Irish this sentence would be "Is é an mangó cad atá á iarraidh agam." which means "It is the mango that is my wanting/have my want". In other Hawaiian sentences for the idea of "X=Y" you say "He kumu ʻo Kaʻiulani" (A teacher is Ka'iulani) so I'm guessing it's the same idea?

    Therefore "your wanting = the mango", I guess? Then it's just flipped but the same phrasing with "ʻo" sticking with manakō.

    I have no idea if that made any sense but maybe I helped?


    [deactivated user]

      My understanding is that ʻo is a nominative marker; it introduces the subject of the sentence. The English translation as given is not a literal translation. Koʻu = my, and makemake = desire, want, wish. Therefore, the mango is what I want, or, my desire is the mango (neither of these sound right), so I want the mango is as good a translation as any. Edit: This structure, "the mango is my desire," seems to be a way to emphasize the mango (as opposed to something else) compared to "I want the mango."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalacticKe

      Why the nominative marker and not the copula, though (i.e. why not "He ka manakō…"?)? This is the first sentence I've seen here with neither verb nor copula.


      [deactivated user]

        If you think of "He" as a/an and "Ka/Ke" as the, He ka manakō is not right/"A the mango-." I don't know if this helps, but an alternative is Makemake au i ka manakō. E kala mai i'au/I'm sorry, I don't know enough 'ōlelo Hawai'i to answer your question fully.


        [deactivated user]

          From "Hawaiian Dictionary" Pukui and Elbert: "He. indefinite article. A, an; to be a, have (with a possessive ). He kanaka maika'i ia, He is a good person."


          [deactivated user]

            Hawai‘ian does not have a verb for to be, nor a copula. According to www.wehewehe.org "he" can mean "a/an", to be a..." (roughly), or "to have (possessive)". It isn't an actual verb "to be".


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikalaIchi

            Why didn't mark my answer wrong when it was exactly the same wording?


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikalaIchi

            Why did it mark my answer wrong when it was exactly the same wording.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scott380946

            I wrote "Mango is my preference", and was marked wrong. But I still don't think it should be.

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