"Arrostiamo qualche patata dolce."

Translation:We roast some sweet potatoes.

April 4, 2013

25 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/val234

isn't the plural of patata, patate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

Yes! But unlike alcune, qualche is followed by the singular. You can think of the use of everybody in English. It refers to more than one, but it is followed by third person singular conjugations.

  • Mangio qualche biscotto - I eat a few cookies
  • Leggo qualche libro - I read some books

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris123456

(Gently inquiring - and hoping to help :) So should this read "Mangio alcuni biscotti" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

Good catch! Yes: mangio qualche biscotto or mangio alcuni biscotti :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corern
  • 1030

Thanks so much for clearing that up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/val234

that clears it up, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maddyis7

As Mukkapazza says, with qualche you use the singular. If you wanted to use 'patate' (plural) you could write "Arrostiamo delle patate..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regsur

So how would you write, "We roast some sweet potato", which is perfectly acceptable in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bellaciao123

Well I'd say it in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CTrinity

I would never say that in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markml0528

I don't think that's grammatically correct in english. If anything, it is a slang or regional dialect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eisalehi

It's certainly not slang or dialect: if one were describing how to make a dish, one might very easily (and correctly) say, "I fry some onion in a skillet, add some garlic...," and so on. There are definitely circumstances in which "We roast some sweet potato" would be just as acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyJamesM

You are quite right.

Maybe some of the other people have not eaten sweet potato.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regsur

I agree - I think! When mukkapazza says that 'qualche' is followed by the singular, does she mean singular in Italian only (patata), singular in English (potato), or singular in Italian and plural in English (potatoes). Not being argumentative - just asking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristelDK

She means that "qualche" takes a verb in the singular in Italian and will be translated by a noun in the plural in English, followed by a verb in the plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karmaria

So I wrote "We roast any sweet potato" even though I'm aware qualche means some and uses the singular. But why is my translation incorrect, and how would you say it in Italian then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I believe that would use "Qualunque" or "Qualsiasi" instead of "Qualche".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

I agree that "some sweet potatoe" is perfectly acceptable and very common in English, no matter what the number or quantity. It should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David6809

If I ever encounter this algorithm, I'm going to shove its pedantic little algo up it's ithm .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agusnina

patata is singular


[deactivated user]

    I'm confused, I thoughy 'patata americana' was sweet patatio


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dee512828

    Me too. I thought it should be patata americana


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

    "We roast some sweet potato" in English implies any amount of sweet potato - that is, it could be one, two, three or more. So this answer should be accepted for similar reasons as the finer points of grammar noted below. Reported.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manana922

    would it be acceptable to say alcune patate dolci? I get confused when to use qualche and when to use alcune.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yolanda20247

    Perché patate non è corretto? Qualche patate?

    Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.