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  5. "Abbiamo molto da fare."

"Abbiamo molto da fare."

Translation:We have a lot to do.

May 14, 2014

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharinglanguage

Io ho molto da imparare :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fibbia2000

Fare is to do; imparare is to learn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Master_Katarn

"Much to learn you still have!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPickering

What is the function of 'da'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandrabruck

The preposition "da" in front of an infinitive expresses that there is something you "have to do" and the sense of the sentence gets a passive meaning.

(i.e. La bicicletta รจ da riparare. I questionari sono da riempire. (here you can see the passive meaning)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erdnaoluap

Hi sandrabruck. And if the word "per" is used, then "per fare" still has any meaning in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandrabruck

per + infinitive = in order to/ to + infinitive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erdnaoluap

thanks, and happy holidays.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Al-kz

Hey sandrabruck, what about 'di' like in 'lui ha deciso DI venire', I suppose it's exactly like 'DA' but for certain verbs... am I right?, if I'm wrong, how does DI work? grazie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertthecheese

Could this not also mean, "We have a lot to make."? Like, if I were baking cupcakes with somebody I could say to them, "We have a lot (of cupcakes) to make."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lsibrel

That was my translation as well...no luck


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbleezy

I think it should be accepted, though generally it means "do"... Example- if I was baking and somebody said what are you doing (cosa fai), I would say baking, not cookies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miry23

We have so much to do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdimicco

Why is "we have to do a lot" not a correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertthecheese

"To have to" is "dovere" in italian, so the sentence you mention would translate as "Dobbiamo fare molto." The sentence in question uses "avere" which is "to have" in a literal sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbordogna

...e poco tempo per farlo

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