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"To talk about someone"

Translation:Kumkalia mtu kitako

December 9, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboutpurpo

It would really help to have the literals in the helps. Then we could make sense out of the idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeMixo2

the whole section needs to be improved by first giving the literal meaning and then the implied meaning and some explanation of that if it is not intuitive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernst557459

Kukalia = to be sat (on)", mtu = person, kitako = ass. So literally: To sit on a person's ass?? Hmm, I prefer to sit on my own.

Since the Swahili expression sounds rather negative, I imagine this could be a colloquial expression for 'to gossip about someone'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonandNe

That was my thought too though that is not accepted as an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aframsterdam

I asked a native speaker and he said it means to hold somebody back or to control someone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

Of course, one simple way to translate "to talk about someone" (with a negative connotation) is kumsema mtu. E.g., Watu walikuwa wikimsema sana Abedi, lakini alipopata kazi nzuri Mombasa, ilibidi wanyamaze.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolenicole2727

At this rate its just guess work..it is very hard for a learner tp figure the translation out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bahatimoe

Talking shit about someone! Haha gotcha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaSheppa2

The idiom is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank529236

I agree the translation is wrong. Kitako is not needed in the translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

Plug the phrase "kumkalia mtu kitako" into a Google search, and ignoring links to Duolingo itself, check out the results. It would seem that according to some sources, the above is a correct translation, but other sources offer a different translation, something like "to hold someone back (from progressing/suceeding etc). I'm not prepared to say whether these sources are reliable or not. But this does indicate a general concern with using proverbs, sayings, etc to "spice up" a conversation or a piece of writing: some proverbs and sayings mean different things to different people.

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