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  5. "Ke Akua pū!"

"Ke Akua pū!"

Translation:God be with you!

December 11, 2018

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieHB

Why does "Ke Akua pu" require "Ke" as compared to "Iesu pu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Because akua is a "common noun", it usually has a noun marker in front of it. The common way to express "God", with a capital G, in Hawaiian is with "ke Akua" (with a capital A). When referring to other akua, a lower case a is the norm. Iesū is a name, so it doesn't appear with a noun marker in front of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JArgeles

I'm not sure but I think it's because Iesū is a name, while Akua is only a noun, so we have to place a determiner before it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyRose232636

The literal translation is The God bless. There is no ʻoe to make it you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JTRAPDOOR11

What is the accent at the end meant to sound like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cloud_eight

The "ū" sounds like a regular "u" in Hawaiian, just pronounced longer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soy_Jaguar

Does Akua mean God, or can it mean any god? Like, could it mean Ke Pele pū as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Because akua is a "common noun", it usually has a noun marker in front of it. The common way to express "God", with a capital G, in Hawaiian is with "ke Akua" (with a capital A). When referring to other akua, a lower case a is the norm. Iesū is a name, so it doesn't appear with a noun marker in front of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darrenluns

I think because it's a translation of the expression "God bless" in english. Many Hawaiians converted to christianity in the 1800s and accepted the monotheistic God of thee bible. The expression "God bless" is mostly a Christian term. So "Ke Akua" is referring to the God of the bible. In the bible when "God" appears with a capital "G" the original language usually has a definite article... basically "The" God. This distinguished the God of the bible from other gods that were referred to. Anyway, that's my guess... I'm no authority.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaVan280949

I think the word akua and atua are the same, only in a different language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

This is a link of sentences in Hawaiian using the word "Akua". (link): http://ulukau.org/chd/baibala/baibala-conc-akua.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JArgeles

I'm guessing pū means "with you"? Do the pronouns in Hawaiian decline?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I am not a linguist, and do not have a linguist's understanding of Hawaiian, but I think it is fair to say that it is common for pronouns to not appear in a Hawaiian sentence when you might see them in a counterpart English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

I am assuming that "(Iesu or ke Akua) pu" is an idiom? I can't find any translation of "pu" that fits (https://wehewehe.org/gsdl2.85/cgi-bin/hdict?e=q-11000-00---off-0hdict--00-1----0-10-0---0---0direct-10-ED--4--textpukuielbert%2ctextmamaka-----0-1l--11-en-Zz-1---Zz-1-home-p%c5%ab--00-4-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-00-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&d=D18711) other than the first: "Horn, a musical instrument," "Large triton or helmet shell," "any wind instrument," "trumpets"... So, sort of an exhaltation (trumpeting?) of God or Jesus, inferring he "be with you"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Maybe it means more like definition 12 in this link (http://ulukau.org/chd/p344.pdf) - pū₁₂ part. together, entirely, completely, also with, together with. (Gram. 7.1) PPN puu. like pū exactly alike Me ʻoe pū. Same to you [as in reply to a good wish]. moku pū broken completely noho pū to live together, as without benefit of clergy ʻO au pū. Me too. ʻO kāua pū. So will I; you and I both. Pau pū kāua i ka hoʻopaʻi ʻia. We'll be punished together. ʻula pū entirely red **(or this one - although it didn't have a macron...???): pu adj. With; together with; along with; in company; ku pu, to stand together; like pu, just alike.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moanikm

I dont understand why this is a whole section. Its important to learn the term ke akua but this is just a weird reminder of the wrongful colonization that took place. Not every Hawaiian converted to Christianity. I think this section assumes too much and is slightly insensitive to the native hawaiian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasmine944201

Mahalo nui loa e Moanimk. I've heard from Duolingo discussion boards it's because this Hawai'ian 'olelo on Duolingo is contributed by Kamehameha schools, with their missionary (i.e. Christian i.e. colonial) rooting. I, a Kanaka Maoli fighting for sovereignty, hate this section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kupuarodrigo

Akua is God, is not "ke akua". "Ke Akua" is a "Guide Spirit of the family" But repeat, God is Akua.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristinaW47062

So why no pronunciation on Akua?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyRose232636

Just use the regular vowel sounds. You may need to review the HaKaLa if you donʻt know them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gettelevy

christian, white supremacy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuruSweetPickle

Kind of wish there were an option to report comments. This adds absolutely nothing but a dose of hate to the forums.

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