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  5. "De' bonaw'meH De'wI' bopoQ."

"De' bonaw'meH De'wI' bopoQ."

Translation:You need a computer in order to access the information.

December 13, 2018

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike-lima

so De' means data or information as a noun. But De' must also be a verb, because we have the word De'wI'. We don't have a definition, however. If it means "to give information" then De'wI' also means informer. Bet maybe it has a meaning of elaborating or collecting information. On the other hand we see klingons and humans alike to ask their computers for information all the time, so to them it could actually represent an informer...

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

There are some words that look like they derive from other words, but they don't. This is one of those words. There is no verb De'.

Other words like this one are chamwI' technician (there is no verb cham) and DeghwI' helmsman (there is no verb Degh having anything to do with steering ships).

For a more detailed explanation of this phenomenon, see The Klingon Dictionary, section 3.2.3.

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike-lima

I read that section again, but it is not specific to this case. When I wrote that De' must be a verb, I admit I used the wrong word, I should have said it might have a meaning as a verb too. It would be cool if it were, because it could be a way to improve our knowledge of the known dictionary.

I think my argument makes at least a bit of sense, and that it could be possible that there is a verb that has not been revealed yet, or that has fallen in disuse. I am not entirely satisfied with the fallen into disuse explanation, though, because we tend to reuse words from our experience for new things, and over time their meaning may become prevalent, but it could still be understood. If you talked of a computer 100 years ago, people would think of a person, and that meaning may surprise our contemporaries, but it is still there.

There may be another explanation, that your examples of chamwI' and DeghwI' could suggest too...

Maybe x-wI' could be a non canonical name suffix that indicate "someone or something doing/related to x"

I have examples in Italian, mostly, but perhaps engineer may be an example of this in English. Someone that does engines. Or cares for engines.

... Ah! And this is another example of a noun-wI' word, as jonwI' is also an engineer.

I suppose that if it were a suffix it would have to be type 0...

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

Your speculations are mostly sound and most of us have thought them and a few have even said them before. However, we do not know of any such verbs or any such suffixes, so as teachers we must discourage use of them. They are speculations only and I commend your carefully considered possibilities. Feel free to continue to post similar speculations, but expect that, since other students are also reading this, we will always point out that it is just speculation and we do not know of any such things.

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

it could be a way to improve our knowledge of the known dictionary.

The only way we can improve our knowledge of the dictionary is for an authoritative source to tell us more. If Klingons were real we could ask a Klingon how their language works. Since Klingons are not real we must rely on the creator of the language to tell us what its fictional speakers would say is correct and true. Languages do not necessarily do whatever is logical to its speakers, so we can't reason new information into the dictionary. We must be told.

it could be possible that there is a verb that has not been revealed yet

It could be.

or that has fallen in disuse

Could be.

we tend to reuse words from our experience for new things, and over time their meaning may become prevalent, but it could still be understood.

If you believe that, you'd be surprised to learn how many words have changed their meanings so much as to be completely unrelated to their original meanings. Did you know, for instance, that the word cockamamie originally comes from a Paris fashion of image-transfer ornamentation? When you eat pumpernickel bread, do you consider how it was named after a farting devil? When you see someone wearing a seersucker suit, do you remember that it comes from a Persian phrase meaning sugar and milk, and before that, Sanskrit for dirt, gravel?

If you talked of a computer 100 years ago, people would think of a person, and that meaning may surprise our contemporaries, but it is still there.

And most people today do not know that. I consider an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, "The Big Goodbye," when the 1930s holodeck character Silas Redblock hears the word computer and repeats it like he's never heard it before. The writers of that episode never considered, or possibly never knew, that the word computer had a different meaning before the devices we know today were invented.

Maybe x-wI' could be a non canonical name suffix that indicate "someone or something doing/related to x"

Could be.

Or it could be something else entirely that you haven't even considered yet.

So which is it? Can you draw any conclusions? Can you convince me of one of them?

No, you can't. You don't have any information to go on. Unless you can find some evidence, all you've got is speculation. Speculation is fine, but it's not conclusive, and if you go off and create your own dialect of the language in which your personal speculation is true, no one else is going to understand you.

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But De' must also be a verb, because we have the word De'wI'.

By that logic, "fing" must be a verb, because we have the word "finger".

("He finged me with his finger. I hate it when he fings me." ?)

Sometimes, what looks like a suffix may just be a coincidence - not something we can derive other words from.

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike-lima

Isn't it? I am not a native speaker! I find new strange words every day :)

I would have more ti discuss, but maybe later!

December 13, 2018
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