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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoongi915798

I'm Not Sure About This...

Okay, I'm doing Spanish and Irish but I'm only doing Spanish for high school. And I want to do Irish because I'm planning on going to Ireland in a couple of years; and this might sound like a stupid question. But I'm wondering if I should concentrate more on Irish or Spanish or if I could concentrate good enough on both. What do you think?

December 13, 2018

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BodgieFift

Do Irish if you want to speak Irish in Ireland you can every where I went I found people who spoke it and a real lot who said they wished they could speak it . Find out before you go where the Gaeltacht areas are there are a lot of Gaeltacht areas in the west from the top of the country to the bottom but look into it and find where they are . If you are going to Dublin they have pop up Gaeltacht from time to time here is a Facebook group that has them in Dublin https://www.facebook.com/popupgaeltacht/ or contact https://cnag.ie/ga/ Chonradh na Gaeilge they have a club but will also help you find other places . I found people in Belfast without trying just here and there but if you want to go somewhere there will be Irish speakers go to falls road gaeltacht quarter there are Restaurants and caf├ęs and more in Irish .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
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A future planned trip to Ireland is not a good reason for learning Irish - you'll have to go out of your way to find someone to speak Irish with, as English is the first language for the vast majority of people in Ireland (search YouTube for "You Ming Is Ainm Dom").

On the other hand, Being a student of Irish is a good reason for planning a future trip to Ireland.

In short, unless you are specifically interested in the Irish language or traditional Irish music, then learning Irish probably won't enhance your future trip all that much, at least compared to the amount of time that you will need to devote to studying the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hollie2237

Well, I'm pretty sure Irish isn't commonly spoken in Ireland anymore. So you'll be fine in Ireland speaking English! Although it's up to you. Do you want to focus on Spanish for class with some extra learning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11_kasia

Concentrate on both!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoongi915798

I'm actually homeschooled :( Trust me you don't want it! No, I'm doing this Spanish course for my highschool class.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertaFra326642

I think you can manage both! I know it's a bit difficult in the beginning when you only just start out on a new language - and Irish IS a bit difficult... I've been doing Welsh for a while, and I started out on Irish just a few weeks ago, and it still looks pretty difficult - but then, so did Welsh in the beginning. And it's really very rewarding when you feel you start getting into a new language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mel_Wolf

I'm learning both Spanish and dabbling in other languages. Learning to study more than one language at once is important--think of when you can speak more than 2 languages, say 3 or 4 or 5. You have to consistently practice those languages, or at the very least, brush up on them occasionally. My Spanish teacher (who speaks native spanish and fluent english) is studying Italian, but is also brushing up on her German. In an average week she is working in 4 different languages. Learning sooner, rather than later, to separate the languages in your head and being able to focus on one, without the other being affected, is important for any future polyglot. Good luck with your Spanish and Irish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brighid

Learn both, or even more languages, you can never learn too much. But unfortunately Ireland is a predominately English speaking country, so you don't actually have to learn Irish to be understood here.

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.