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  5. "This girl is five years old."

"This girl is five years old."

Translation:ʻElima makahiki o kēia kaikamahine.

December 17, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArgusC

Why does "kēia" come between the "o" and "kaikamahine" instead of after?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

Demonstratives come before the noun they demonstrate. Descriptors come after the nouns they describe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArgusC

So in the other sentences where the demonstrative comes at the end of the sentence it's actually a descriptor? For example: He waiū hou kēia? Is this fresh milk? Or does it come at the end in that case because it's a question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

So in English we can say, "this girl". That is a demostrative adjective - it is attached to a noun. Then we can also just say "this", like "This is milk." That is a demonstration pronoun - it is standing alone and representing the whole noun.

Same thing in Hawaiian. "Waiū hou" means "fresh milk". "Kēia maukuahine" means "this girl". "Hou kēia waiū," would mean, "this milk is fresh." You can tell kēia is attached to the milk because it is in front of it. If Kēia is after the milk, then it must be doing something else, so, "He waiū hou kēia," means, "This is fresh milk," and the kēia is acting all on its own and not attached to anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Now that is one good explanation. Mahalo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArgusC

That's good to know. Thanks for the help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

Another way to look at it is as a dropped "mea". He waiu hou keia mea. = He waiu hou keia ( ). The "keia" is in front of the omitted noun "mea".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaSha535715

Can someone explain why the "o" is present and the reason for its placement?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

The "o" is a possessive marker, showing that the years belong to the girl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scarvbarv

That makes a bit more sense if you know of other languages (like Spanish or French) where your age is the number of years you have, not the number of years you are.

Yo tengo catorce años. J'ai cinquante ans.

Not really a concept that carries over to English or, for example, German.

I am thirty. Ich bin fünfzehn Jahre alt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael199011

What's the difference between 'o and o (with and w/o the 'okina)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

'O (with okina) marks the subject. o (without okina) indicates ownership.

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