https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash.Purple

How are newly created verbs made to be are/ere/ire verbs?

In Italian, when a new verb is created (say through pop culture) does the verb ending of are/ere/ire get decided by some kind of grammar rule or is it completely random/naturally occurring?

December 20, 2018

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

For foreign loanwords turned into verbs, it seems like a lot of them have -are endings. That's what I've seen for English terms made popular by the Internet, anyway, things like "spoilerare," "stalkerare," and I've even seen "friendzonare."

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Yes, a very large majority of new verbs take the -are ending and have a regular conjugation.

Reference:
http://www.accademiadellacrusca.it/it/lingua-italiana/consulenza-linguistica/domande-risposte/coniugazione-nuove-formazioni-verbali

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lksaltern

Yeah, that seems to be the pattern. New verbs from foreign words will typically be -are verbs in Italian, -ar verbs in Spanish and -er verbs in French (the most common type in all three languages). In the same way, new English verbs from foreign words will have past tenses ending in -ed (like "play/played" rather than "speak/spoke"). German is kind of weird in that it adds the rare -ieren ending to many verbs from languages like French and Italian rather than treating them like more common German verbs.

December 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

Spanish tends to add "-ear": "chatear," "linkear," "textear," and also "friendzonear," of course, haha. : )

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lksaltern

Wow! I just googled it (acabo de googlearlo) and "friendzonear" is a real word. At least it is now :)

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

Yes, apparently no language would be complete without the verb "to friendzone."

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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Well, it was needed! :) In '97 they had to invent "the friend's rule" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3aBTgcE_bE) but while the song was popular the term never caught on.

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash.Purple

Interesting. What about newly formed verbs that are not foreign originated? Do they usually go with -are too?

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Usually they do.
The only new verbs that can theoretically take an -ire ending are the ones that indicate "becoming or turning into something or someone". Such verbs likely take an extra in- suffix (im- before b- and p-), which infers a sense of transformation, or becoming.
Some standard verbs with these features already exist, e.g. acido → inacidire, brutto → imbruttire, geloso → ingelosire, pazzo → impazzire. But new ones are really very scarce (I can't even think of a recent one), because they are mostly used merely in a playful manner (they never become real verbs), and because in many cases the -are ending is used instead of -ire (e.g. common standard ones are arco → inarcare, vecchio → invecchiare, etc.).
This is why I wrote that they can theoretically take -ire.
For instance, if somebody started writing or posting comments in my own style, one could use the verb incivisire. :-D
But this would obviously be a pun, the verb would never be taken seriously.

December 21, 2018
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