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"Nosotros lo hacíamos."

Translation:We used to do it.

4 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KatheChB
KatheChB
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Duo shh :$

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryMacki1

In English, without a clearifing context, the 'it' would tend to be 'sex'. Is that also the case in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moltrev
Moltrev
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Yes, in spanish is the same. I am a spanish native.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaelum10

Hell yeah

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/60tvaldez

We were doing it when...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

DL came in with the next sentence: What were you doing with my boyfriend?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DomCimafranca
DomCimafranca
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"We had done it" should also be acceptable, no?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmariajordan

No, that would be "Lo habíamos hecho."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alk-357

nosotros lo hicimos (sounds, completed work) // lo haciamos (lo estabamos haciendo) (sounds, unfinished work)

Hicieron la tarea? 1) Si lo hicimos 2) lo haciamos, pero..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DouglasDod10

These guys are mush mouths. Even knowing that the word was "lo" it sounded like "no." They need to enunciate better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Also accepted is 'We made it.' which is a long way in meaning from 'We used to do it.' I'm still somewhat confused, despite the helpful explanations provided by some posters.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It may be confusing because imperfect is used in different situations.

My answer was "We were making it" and that was accepted also.

We made it is also fine as long as you mean something that you used to make repeatedly in the past.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jleiney

is this a sentence fragment in spanish or does this carry the same innuendo as it does in english?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zanzaboonda
zanzaboonda
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I don't know about the innuendo (although an answer above implies yes), but it would not be a sentence fragment, either way. "Have you ever done the hokey pokey?" "We used to do it." It has a subject and a predicate. Complete sentence. (Unlike that one.) Not being nitpicky; I know there are some English language learners on here and just wanted to clarify. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaelum10

It can be an aswer, or something, but yes, it has a sexual innuendo too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamLarge
AdamLarge
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We used to do it and we made it are so different. Is there a more commonly used verb for 'to make' that is used to avoid confusion or do people just understand each other from the context. I love Spanish, it's such a logical language compared with my native English but some sentences have so many multiple meanings i think i will always be seeking clarification!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henri754868

Why is this Spanish tense always translated with "used to.." can someone explain that to me?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

This is the imperfect tense, which indicates past actions that don't have a specific beginning or end point. This includes repeated/habitual actions (I used to eat there every Sunday. / We would sing along with the radio), actions in progress when something else happened (I was cooking dinner when...), or actions that are just background description (It was raining. / She wore/was wearing a long blue skirt).

As you can see from my examples, the imperfect can be translated into English using 'used to do', 'would do', 'was doing' or sometimes just 'did', depending on the context. I think that Duolingo tends to prefer 'used to' more for simplicity's sake (and to avoid confusion with the conditional, as discussed in comments above), but the other options I've noted are correct and should also be accepted. Hope that helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henri754868

hi :) thanks a lot i never expected to get such a helpful answer!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mtycer

Esta es la mejor explicación de pretérito imperfecto que yo escuché. Muy clara y concisa. Gracias!!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mtycer

Esta es la mejor explicación de pretérito imperfecto que yo escuché. Muy clara y concisa. Gracias!!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frofa

Am I the only one who clearly hears "haciémos" instead of "hacíamos". Not that this word exists, I know, but the the computer voice sometimes really sucks. There are some words it just does not get right - like the female computer voice that always says "éstoy" instead of "estoy", which is really bad for teaching purposes. I mean, if we knew all Spanish words, with their correct pronunciation, so that we could say with confidence "ah, that must be wrongly pronounced and mean X because there is no Spanish word like Y", we wouldn't use Duolingo to learn the language, would we? Just because any native speaker of English would infer "newspaper" from some strange audio that sounds like "noosbeb" doesn't mean we should teach people such a pronunciation. In fact, when learning a language, we do not have the "fallback strategy" of a native speaker to complete in our brain words and sentences of which we hear only 20-30%. The brain can easily fill large gaps in our native language, but in a language we are learning this comes very very late - much later than any level Duolingo can teach us; I would say it takes years of conversing with native speakers to acquire this ability. Or, in other words, most people will realistically never achieve this level of proficiency in their third or fourth language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I hear haciamos.

One of the ways of learning to distinguish these sounds - to build up the database of fill-in sounds and words - is to very carefully and slowly pronounce the words when first learning them, then repeat them several times when encountered again, speaking problem words slowly and gradually speeding them up as you are able to pronounce them. By learning to pronounce words precisely, then listening to how they are pronounced by the computer voice, you actually build up that database of fill-in sounds. It very much aids in hearing spoken language if you practice saying it.

I make certain on each and every exercise that I can pronounce each word, then string them together, first slowly and then more quickly.

Another thing about this method is to pay attention to what the sentence means, and try to separate it out into sections of meaning, if the sentence is complex enough to warrant that, so that emphasis and grouping of words stems naturally from the meaning of the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DouglasDod10

I totally agree with you. I have gotten used to the female voice somewhat, but the male voice is terrible - poor pronunciation and enunciation - even when I slow it down. Very frustrating

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frofa

I find the female voice worse. The male voice sounds artificial in many instances (and is at times more difficult to understand than an educated native speaker), but it is rarely plain wrong like the female "éstoy" or "haciémos".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CeeCeeSong

well, in my translation, it was "we made it." My question was then if it works the same as in English, where that expression can be used to say, "we arrived," and "We did it!" as well as in actually making something. Anyone know?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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My guess is probably not in the situation that you are describing. I've noticed that Spanish speakers generally use llegar in those situations. For example, rather than say the equivalent of "I was on time" or "I made it on time" I'd say "I arrived on time" in Spanish. Llegué a tiempo.

According to wordreference,

  • Make [something] (arrive at) = llegar or (náutica) arribar. The ship made port early in the morning. = El barco llegó al puerto por la mañana. El barco arribó al puerto por la mañana.

  • Make [something] (train, plane: reach in time) = coger (excepto AR) , subir, tomar. I have to run if I want to make my train. = Tengo que correr si quiero coger mi tren. Tengo que correr si quiero subir a mi tren.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Also, we were doing it, is a valid translation

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CandlePurple

Why not "We used to do that?"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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"it" and "that" are not interchangeable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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... at least not on Duolingo.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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They usually are so in English. "I did that " and "I did it", there's no much a wedge between the meanings, laddie.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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You young whippersnappers will be the death of us all.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EaterofPumkin
EaterofPumkin
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We did it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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That would be preterit if you were talking about something you did once or a specified number of times. (absolutely no puns or double-meanings intended). Lo hicimos.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseLuisnovember

A que se referiran ? ^_^

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Podría ser cualquier acción. No sabemos aunque algunas personas piensan que implica algo en particular. ¿Tal vez estás bromeando?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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The Beatles with a song very relevant to this sentence:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQWTK9WEpOk

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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I found that DL will accept both, "We used to do it" and "We were doing it." How is this correct when the former and latter seem to mean two different things?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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The Spanish imperfect refers to any action in the past that isn't viewed as a single discrete event. Generally they can be described as either events that were in the process of taking place (equivalent to English past progressive - we were doing) or events not in progress at the moment in question but that habitually occurred in the past (equivalent to the English past habitual - we used to do).

So the imperfect is fairly broad, especially compared to English, and that's why it covers two English constructions that are a little different.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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Thanks for the great explanation. It answers my question well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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The Spanish Imperfect is not English, and we all are translating for apt meaningfulness, no so much to impress the strictures of some in a language upon a much different language indeed.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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I don't understand what this has to do with my comment.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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In Spanish translate into Englishthe phrase "Nosotros lo hacíamos.". The translation that the web page shows after I got it wrong with "We did make it," is "We'd make it."! WOW! That's a very ambiguous English phrase. But okay, for TRANSLATION is always subjective, and in the context of one small phrase, never gonna be so grand, meaning never very accurate or fitting to every context of the usage in real life of that original language phrase, nor fitting to every context of the usage in real life of the "permitted" translated phrase.

Especially English, and as Sheakspeare recast it, the most powerful language of emotions, and emotions need a lot of context to be deteminative. Why don't the "grammar" boffins of boffin cities and castles with high towers consider emotional grammar of phrasings? Life is more than the fact of bread, buttered.

1 day ago