https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Tips & Tricks (Japanese)

Hi! I'd like to learn Japanese and Korean after advancing in my Spanish course. I took a look at it and I have trouble remembering the signs for the sounds. I've tried Duolingo before and attempted at learning Japanese last year but I got less motivated to do it daily because I had trouble remembering the signs. I want to take it easy this time and try again in the near future. Any tips? (This also applies for Korean)

EDIT: Thank you guys so much! I wish I could repay you guys, seriously!!! I'm surprised how many people commented, to be honest. I appreciate this a whole bunch! (And you guys helped others too, so thanks for that aswell! ) <3

2 weeks ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas_Wesley
Thomas_Wesley
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Learning how to write the kana will probably help you remember them more easily. That was certainly the case with me! Even without consistent practice I find I can write most of them (maybe all of them?) from memory.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Chander_
_Chander_
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I cannot help you with Korean, but I will help you as an intermediate learner in Japanese:

Duolingo is not bad for learning a new language, but I suggest that you should learn the hiragana and katakana characters on your own to save time. For your help, there is a grammar book that may help you start off well(and it's free): https://archive.org/stream/Genki/Genki%20I%20-%20Integrated%20Elementary%20Japanese%20Course%20%28with%20bookmarks%29#page/n31/mode/2up

After you familiarise with the roots of Japanese, you must then progress onto learning the Kanji, which is obviously the most difficult task, as there are thousands of them. However, this task can be achieved much efficiently and easily if you follow this book: The Kondansha Kanji Learner's Course by Andrew Scott Conning. This will help you to learn the many Kanji characters that you will need to achieve a high level of fluency. You can also download the book as a pdf.

I hope this would help you.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doceteme
doceteme
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Thank you

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ningyo.M

thank you for sharing it

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittyBlossom0802

Wow! Awesome link. Thank you. I've been searching for this book for ages. ありがとうございました. ^^

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Chander_
_Chander_
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Your welcome:)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mimi584157

Thank you so much!!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you!!!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinPerk9

So a tip is to try not to learn all of the symbols at once. That's what I did with Hiragana and is doing so with Katakana. I try to remember 5 new symbols a day with 2 apps called Hiragana Pro and Katakana Pro. There really good and helped me a lot about learning them.

If you want try to remember 1 set at a time. So remember all the A's like, KA, SA, NA, TA and WA.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Chander_
_Chander_
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This is one way you could learn, but I learned in sets of constant consonant: for example, ka,ki,ku,ke,ko and so on. This was much easier to memorise, according to my experience, because you know that there are a maximum of five characters in each set

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you, I'll try to maybe combine both ways in the future!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you! I'll definitely try that.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittyBlossom0802

Learn Korean for a year , then start Japanese . This will help a lot in understanding grammar .

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Noted, thanks!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacob310885

Honestly, the only tip I can give you is to keep reviewing the basics until you eventually get it. I have been learning Japanese for almost a year and only until recently did I get past Hiragana. Also, listening to Japanese music, and just getting exposed to the language as much as possible will help. Good luck buddy.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Noted, thanks! :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ningyo.M

here is what has worked for me

about kana, use flash cards, master one row (K,R,N...) each day. when you are done, have flash cards with you and review them at any tiny spare time you have, like when you are waiting for a bus or sitting in a car... and have the complete chart printed on like an A4 paper and put it on the wall next to your bed. by seeing them over and over again, you won't forget.

about kanji, I suggest first you only learn the strokes. for example memories that 女 is woman then, when you know what the kanji is when you see it, then learn おんな means woman. or do it vice versa, I mean first learn the meaning then look for the kanji. learning the strokes of a kanji, the list of its onyomi, the list of its kunyomi, and several meanings at the same time can be real pain.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you so much! c:

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/escaprism
escaprism
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Well, what I did was take a grid notebook and fill out a whole page with the hiragana from the first lesson. Likewise, in one of the lines I wrote down the pronunciation of the respective hiragana to repeat it while writing, and in another page I wrote how to join certain symbols to obtain words, and their meanings. I also practiced many times the first lesson here in Duolingo, and only advanced to the second when I could write from memory all the hiragana of the first lesson. I started less than a week ago (four days, lol) and I already memorized almost thirty hiragana. In addition to all this, some symbols can be associated with shapes (Tinycards help a little). For example, the symbol for the sound "i" looks like two toothpicks. The sound of "a" is like a flower, or a bike. The "mu" looks identical to a cow. "So" looks like a dancer. "Yo" is like a snake. I think "Sa" and "Chi" are the same, but Sa has the curve to the left, and Chi to the right; so you can look at your hands and say "SaChi", from left to right, to make it easier. "Shi" is like a soft curve that reminds me of the "shh" sound, and "N" literally looks like a letter n.

I hope I've helped.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thanks, this is very appreciated ^-^

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherryParfait

When I first began learning Japanese and Korean, I had trouble remembering the alphabet as well. I don’t really have any tips on remembering things but I’ll just say this- The first thing you should do is memorize the alphabet, don’t start learning vocabulary just yet. (With Japanese, only learn Hiragana and Katakana first, maybe learn a few Kanji.) Then go on to learn simple greetings. (Then learn vocabulary) (Also, with Kanji, I think you’ll need to learn about 1000-3000, I know it sounds like a lot but you’ll get there!) One more thing, I recommend a website called Memrise, I use it for Korean and Japanese and it helps a lot! (Don’t use the app, you have to pay)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thanks for the info, I really appreciate it ^u^

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/White-Camillia

I also couldn't remember the symbol at first, what I did is make a Google Doc and write down the word, pronounciation, and translation.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

I'll try that :D

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catankitty
catankitty
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LingoDeer is a useful app for learning Japanese and other languages.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ParkTed

As a Korean who is learning Japanese now, I can say that learning Korean beforehand will help tremendously for learning Japanese. I think it will work backwards as well, i.e. learning Japanese beforehand will also help you in learning Korean. This is because many of the Hanja(or for Japanese Kanji) are pronounced similarly. For example, 人 is pronounced 인(in) in Korean, and jin in Japanese. First of all, try to be familiar with the writing system(Hangeul for Korean, Kana for Japanese). IMO, Hangeul is much easier to learn than kana but the grammar in Korean language might be more confusing. On the other hand mastering kana takes a little more time but the grammar is a bit less complicated. Good luck!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thanks ^-^

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doceteme
doceteme
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The Dr Moku app helped me to quickly learn both hiragana and katakana. There is a lite version you can try for free.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.root.moko&hl=en_US

...and this for Korean

https://zkorean.com/hangul/appearance

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank you!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PopcornDaydreamz

Check out the #langblr tag on Tumblr, there are lots of tips there for learning many languages, not just Japanese. However, Japanese is a popular language there, so there are posts specific to Japanese.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trashcassissou

i use an app called hiragana learner for kata and hira ;)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ragabash13

I have been doing my best to make mental associations beyond the direct link. Anything that it reminds me of, I take note of. Maybe it sounds like a friends name or the character resembles something else. Anything to associate it to something that might help me remember.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Japa-knees

Just to add on to everyone else’s tips, after you think you have remembered all the hiragana, you can try name them from memory using a random generator. A quick search on google gave me a good result for a random hiragana generator: https://www.joyokanjikai.com/random-hiragana/ Hope this will help :D

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy-Cookie

Thank youuuu Cx

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quenlin1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kodansha_Kanji_Learner%27s_Dictionary

This kanji dictionary has a method of arranging them called SKIP, which uses numbers to denote the style of kanji and stroke order which is much easier for non-natives not good with the concept of radicals to use. It's somewhat similar to the 4-corner method used in Chinese.

The app Japanese by Renzo Inc. allows for searching by SKIP codes, not sure what other ones allow this however.

6 days ago
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