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  5. "Come outside."

"Come outside."

Translation:E puka i waho.

December 31, 2018

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DABurnside

We learned that ka puka is a door (or an opening), so verb it, and it means to go through the door, and i waho is the direction (outside) to go. So, E puka (i waho) is only for exiting and going outside, and E komo (i loko) is only for entering. If I'm outside and want to invite passersby inside my establishment, do I say E komo aku i loko? (aku-away from me, go in there)? Then, I'm standing outside on the sidewalk during a fire drill, do I say E puka mai i waho? (Mai=toward me, come outside toward me)? Or are those nonsense in 'ōlelo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

I like the way you make 'verb' a verb. Cool!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanAbonyi

I thought: E puka i waho meant "Go outside". (you are inside when you tell someone to go out). Is it the same phrase if you are outside and asking someone to come out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Komota15

It does seem so. I had a similar moment seeing 'E komo...' as an instruction to enter elsewhere, as I'm so used to it as a greeting relating to encouraging immediate entry. Context context context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pomaikaiui

I thought : "Come outside" (speaker is outside/ listener is inside)= E komo mai I waho (move towards to speaker). "Go outside" (speaker & listener are both inside)= E puka aku i waho (exit the house and move away from speaker). ??? confusing.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HklaniClee

"Komo" is always "to enter," and "puka" is always "to exit." So it's always "komo i loko" and "puka i waho." The directionals "mai" and "aku" simply tell you the perspective of the speaker. So if he tells you, "E puka mai i waho," you know he's outside the house and you're inside. A common greeting (usually translated as "welcome") is "E komo mai!" or "E komo mai i loko o ka hale!" "Komo aku" is theoretically possible but kind of weird; probably better to just leave off the "aku."


[deactivated user]

    "E hele mai" is move toward the speaker.

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